Public lecture: Rags, Riches & Recycling

RDS Library & Archives invites you to attend the RDS Library Speaker Series talk ‘Rags, Riches & Recycling; the Dublin Society’s encouragement of art & artefacts, 1731-1781’ by Dr Claudia Kinmouth on Wednesday 31 October at 6.30pm in the RDS Library, followed by a wine reception.

Dr Claudia Kinmouth, author and design historian, is the recipient of the RDS Library & Archives Research Bursary 2018. She is Moore Institute Visiting Research Fellow, NUI Galway and was elected a member of the RIA in March 2018. Her previous publications include Irish Rural Interiors in Art (2006) and Irish Country Furniture 1770-1950 (1993)

Please RSVP via email
library desk@rds.ie
or call +353 (0)1 2407254

Bookings can also be made online: http://www.rds.ie/Whats-On/Event/37038

Book Launch: Swift’s Irish Political Writings after 1725

Irish Political Writings after 1725: A Modest Proposal and Other Works edited by David Hayton and Adam Rounce is the latest volume of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Jonathan Swift and the first fully annotated edition of Swift’s Irish prose writings from 1726 to 1737.

The book will be launched at 7.30pm on Wednesday, 26 September 2018 at Armagh Robinson Library. Professor Andrew Carpenter will be guest speaker at the event and there will be an opportunity to purchase copies of the book, signed by Professor David Hayton.

Refreshments will be kindly provided by Ulster University.

RSVP by 21 September 2018 via e-mail: admin@armaghrobinsonlibrary.co.uk or telephone: 028 37523142

CFP: Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley

Scholars in any academic discipline are invited to submit abstracts of papers to be presented at the Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley conference, to be held in Trinity College Dublin, 5 and 6 April 2019.

George Berkeley’s Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710) and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713) are standard texts in the philosophy curricula of most European and American universities. No other Irish philosopher, and no other work of Berkeley’s, has achieved this ‘canonical’ status. However, there was a vibrant philosophical scene in Ireland in Berkeley’s lifetime, to which Berkeley was far from the only contributor. Studying this broader Irish philosophical discussion will improve our understanding of Berkeley and also of early modern philosophy more generally.

The Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley conference will include general exploration of the intellectual culture of early modern Ireland as well as examination of specific thinkers with significant connections to Ireland active during Berkeley’s lifetime (1685–1753). Such figures include Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh (1615–1691); Robert Boyle (1627–1691); Michael Moore (c. 1639–1726); William King (1650–1729); William Molyneux (1656–1698); Edward Synge (1659–1741); Jonathan Swift (1667–1745); John Toland (1670–1722); Peter Browne (d. 1735); and Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746).

Invited speakers will include:

• Lisa Downing, Professor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, USA
• Eric Schliesser, Professor of Political Science, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
• Kate Davison, Lecturer in Long Eighteenth-Century History, University of Sheffield, UK
Approximately nine additional papers will be selected by anonymous review of submitted abstracts.

We welcome abstracts from scholars in any discipline addressing one or more of the following issues:

• The Irish context of Berkeley’s philosophy.
• The philosophical work of other Irish thinkers active during Berkeley’s lifetime.
• The reception within Ireland of other philosophical figures, ideas, and movements.
• The reception of Irish philosophy outside Ireland.

Particular preference will be given to papers that address figures and/or topics outside the currently recognized philosophical ‘canon’, including the work of early modern women.
Papers presented at the conference will be published as part of the Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements series, Cambridge University Press.

Abstracts should be submitted by 15 October, 2018. Full details, including submission instructions, are available at: http://www.tcd.ie/Philosophy/events/IPAB/.

Participants and attendees may also be interested in attending Berkeleian Minds: Will and Understanding, to be held at the University of York on 2 and 3 April (https://philevents.org/event/show/63750).

Primary sponsorship for this conference is provided by the Royal Institute of Philosophy, together with the Mind Association. Additional support is provided by the Trinity Long Room Hub Making Ireland Research Theme and the Department of Philosophy, Trinity College Dublin.

A. C. Elias Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowships for 2018

The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) has awarded A.C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowships for 2018 to Kelly J. Hunnings, a Ph.D. Student at the University of New Mexico and Kevin Murphy, a Ph.D student at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Both scholars are writing dissertations that require research into primary eighteenth-century materials in Ireland. Ms. Hunnings’s will travel to Ireland during the summer of 2018 to work on a research project entitled “Ireland and the Laboring-Class Poetic Tradition: The Ecology of the Domestic in Mary Barber’s Verse.” Mr. Murphy’s research trip to Ireland will involve masonic records in Dublin and Cork and the Rebellion Papers at the National Library for a project entitled “Coercion and Sworn Bond in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic.”

The A. C. Elias, Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship, with $2500 in annual funding, supports “documentary scholarship on Ireland in the period between the Treaty of Limerick (1691) and the Act of Union (1800), by enabling North American-based scholars to travel to Ireland and Irish-based scholars to travel to North America”. Projects conducting original research on any aspect of eighteenth-century Ireland qualify for consideration, but recipients must be either (1) members of ASECS who have permanent residence in the United States or Canada, or (2) members of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society, residing in Ireland.

The closing date for the next A. C. Elias, Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship is 15 November 2018. Applications should be sent to the fellowship’s two trustees: Dr. Jason McElligott, The Keeper, Marsh’s Library, St. Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, Ireland (jason.mcelligott@marshlibrary.ie) and Dr. James May (jem4@psu.edu; 1423 Hillcrest Road, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 17603, USA).

Applications must consist of:
• The coversheet downloaded from the ASECS website: https://asecs.press.jhu.edu/general%20site/travelgr.html
• A short curriculum vitae (no more than 3 pages)
• A description of the project to be undertaken (no more than 3 pages, treating its contribution to the field and work to be done during the proposed research period)
• A one-page bibliography of related books and articles
• An indicative budget for the research trip
• Two signed letters of recommendation.

Further information is available from the trustees, Dr McElligott and Dr May, at the email addresses listed above.

CFP: Charles Macklin and the Making of Georgian Theatre

A conference entitled ‘Charles Macklin and the Making of Georgian Theatre’ will take place at the Notre Dame London Gateway, 1 Suffolk St, London on 22-23 June 2018.

Abstracts (max 500 words) for 3-5,000 word papers on Macklin’s life and career should be sent, with a short biography, to both Ian Newman (inewman@nd.edu) and David O’Shaughnessy (doshaug@tcd.ie) by 31 March 2018.

Download the CFP for further information.

Events: 2018 Irish Seminar

The Notre Dame Keough-Naughton Institute’s 2018 interdisciplinary IRISH Seminar will take place in Dublin & Kylemore on 11-29 June 2018. The theme of this year’s seminar is ‘Ireland 1600-1800: Kingdom, Colony, Union, Empire’.

For information on the schedule, application process, and fees, please visit international.nd.edu/irishseminar

Please note that the deadline for applications is 22 February.

Book Launch: James Kelly’s Food Rioting in Ireland

The launch of Prof. James Kelly’s new book Food Rioting in Ireland in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: The ‘Moral Economy’ and the Irish Crowd will take place in the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street, Dublin 2 from 6.00 pm to 8.00 pm on Thursday 30 November 2017.

Food rioting, one of the most studied manifestations of purposeful protest internationally, was practised in Ireland for a century and a half between the early eighteenth century and 1860. This book provides a fully documented account of this phenomenon, and seeks to lay the foundations for a more structured analysis of popular protest during a period when riotous behaviour was normative. Though the study challenges E.P. Thompson’s influential contention that there was no ‘moral economy’ in Ireland because Ireland did not provide the populace with the ‘political space’ in which they could bring pressure to bear on the elite, its primary achievement is, by demonstrating the enduring character of food rioting, to move the crowd from the periphery to the centre. In the process, it offers a rereading of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Irish history, and of the public response to the Great Famine.

The book will be launched by Cormac Ó Gráda, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

RSVP (acceptance only) Four Courts Press | info@fourcourtspress.ie
If you are unable to attend the launch but would still like to purchase a copy
of this book, please contact Four Courts Press directly at 01 453 4668.

To learn more about this book, visit the Four Courts Press website at
http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2017/food-rioting-in-ireland/

CFP: 32nd Irish Conference of Historians, UCC, April 2018

The 32nd Irish Conference of Historians will take place at University College Cork on 26-28 April 2018.

Proposals for papers/panels that address topics relating to the history of sex, sexuality and reproduction, in Ireland and across the world, from antiquity to the 1990s, are now invited. The conference is open to new researchers and established scholars.

For further information, please visit the website of the Irish Committee of Historical Sciences.

 

CFP: Silence in eighteenth-century arts, history and philosophy

The International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ISECS) is pleased to announce the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars.

Formerly called the East-West Seminar, the International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars brings together young researchers from a number of countries each year. The 2018 meeting will take place in Viterbo, Italy and will be organized by Prof.Francesca Saggini and the Dipartimento di studi linguistico-letterari, storico-filosofici e giuridici – DISTU.

Proposals for papers on the subject of the forms, representations and modalities of silence in the eighteenth century, are now invited for presentation at the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars. Colleagues from all fields of eighteenth-century studies are invited to submit abstracts for this one-week event.

For further details, follow this link to download the call for papers.

CFP: Special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019)

Papers are now invited for publication in a special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019), guest edited by Elizabeth Neiman and Tina Morin.

500 word abstracts due by 31 October 2017; first full drafts of 6,000-9,000 words due by May 2018. Please email submissions to Elizabeth Neiman (Elizabeth.Neiman@maine.edu) AND Tina Morin (Christina.Morin@ul.ie).

Follow this link to download the full CFP.

Events: Collective action, popular politics and policing 1700-1850

A symposium entitled ‘Collective action, popular politics and policing in Ireland and Great Britain, 1700-1850’ will take place at the Humanities Institute, University College Dublin on Friday, 1 September 2017.

The event is being chaired by David Hayton and Ivar McGrath and speakers will include Ewen Cameron, Iain Channing, James Kelly, Richard McMahon, Ruth Paley, Martyn Powell, and Timothy Watt.

For further information download the programme here, or contact the organiser, Timothy Watt, at timothy.watt@ucd.ie.

Registration for ECIS Annual Conference closing 4 June

Online registration for the 2017 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference will close at 5pm on Sunday, 4 June 2017.

The conference will take place in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin on 8-9 June 2017.

It is being held this year alongside the major international conference, Swift350, which is taking place to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift across two venues: Trinity College Dublin and Marsh’s Library.

Delegates registered for the ECIS conference may attend all of the Swift350 sessions.

To register now, please visit our Annual Conference page.

CFP: ‘Swift Today’ conference in Sofia University

A conference entitled ‘Swift Today: His Legacy from the Enlightenment to Modern-Day Politics’ will take place in Sofia University on 30 November – 1 December 2017.

The conference will be conducted in English. Abstracts of proposed papers (300 words) are now invited and can be submitted to the organisers at swifttodaysofia@gmail.com by 1 August 2017.

For further details, follow this link to download the full CFP.

 

CFP: Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies is pleased to announce that the sixteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar, Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment, will be held in Brisbane, Australia, at Griffith University and the University of Queensland on the 13th to 15th December 2017.

The following keynote speakers will be presenting at the conference:

  • Deidre Lynch (Harvard University)
  • Jan Golinski (University of New Hampshire)
  • Georgia Cowart (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Sujit Sivasundaram (University of Cambridge)

The Call for Papers is available to view on the ANZSECS website at the following link:

https://anzsecs.com/conference/natures-and-spaces-of-enlightenmentcall-for-papers/

Proposals on any aspect of the long eighteenth century related to the conference theme are welcome.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st August.

If you have any questions about the conference, please contact one of the organisers:

Peter Denney (p.denney@griffith.edu.au) or Lisa O’Connell (l.oconnell@uq.edu.au).

ECIS Annual Conference 2017

The 2017 ECIS Annual Conference will take place in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin on 8-9 June 2017.

It is being held this year alongside the major international conference, Swift350, which is taking place to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift across two venues: Trinity College Dublin and Marsh’s Library.

Four plenaries will be delivered across the two conferences by Prof. Moyra Haslett (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Mary-Ann Constantine (University of Wales), Prof. James Woolley (Lafayette College) and Prof. Ian McBride (University of Oxford).

Delegates registered for the ECIS conference may attend all of the Swift350 sessions.

To view the full programme or to register online, please visit our Annual Conference page.

Please note that online registration will close on 4 June.

Exhibition and public talk on eighteenth-century women’s writing

Armagh Public Library is currently hosting an exhibition of eighteenth-century women’s writing, featuring a number of the printed books held in the library’s collection. The exhibition runs until the end of March.

In association with the exhibition, the Armagh Public Library is also hosting the following public talk to celebrate International Women’s Day:

  • ‘”The Age of Female Authors”: eighteenth-century women’s writing in the Armagh Public Library’
  • Professor Moyra Haslett (Queen’s University Belfast)
  • 7.30pm, Wednesday 8th March
  • Armagh Public Library

All are welcome!

CFP: Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference

The 2017 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference will take place at the Royal Irish Academy and Trinity College Dublin on 7-9 June 2017, running in parallel with Swift350.

Proposals are now invited for twenty-minute papers (in English or Irish) on any aspect of eighteenth-century Ireland, including its history, literature, language, and culture.

Proposals from postgraduate students are particularly welcome and there are a limited number of bursaries available for attendance.

For further information, please visit our Annual Conference page.

CFP: Women, Money and Markets (1750-1850)

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In 2017, Jane Austen will feature on the £10 note as the sole female representative on British currency.  To mark this occasion, and explore its problematic significance, the English department at King’s College London is running a one-day conference on 11 May 2017 entitled ‘Women, Money and Markets (1750-1850)’.

The aim of the conference is to consider debates about women in relation to ideas of value, market, marketability, as well as debates about different forms of currency and exchange amongst women, and the place of the female writer in the literary marketplace past and presentThe conference will address themes including consumerism, shopping, global trade, domestic trade, markets (literary and otherwise), currency, and varying practices of exchange. The conference is interdisciplinary in nature, bridging literature, material culture, gender studies and economic history, and aims to relate the debates of the period to modern day issues about the presence and position of women in the economy and media.

Keynote speakers will include Professor Hannah Barker (University of Manchester), and Caroline Criado-Perez, OBE, one of the leading voices in the campaign for female representation on the banknote and an active promoter and supporter of women in the media.

Submissions are now invited, in the form of individual papers, panels and roundtable discussions, on the following themes:

  • The varying practices of women associated with currency, global and/or domestic markets and marketability
  • Material practices associated with value, exchange and/or female creativity
  • Women as producers and/or consumers in the literary or other marketplaces (including, but not limited to, food, clothing, agriculture and raw materials)
  • Representations of women at work or women’s involvement in:
  • Trade and industry
  • Professional services (such as law, finance, hospitality and the media)
  • Domestic service
  • The rural economy
  • The place of women in the literary marketplace (past and present)

We particularly welcome cross-cultural considerations of the above issues.

Please send 300 word abstracts to the conference email address (womenmoneymarkets@gmail.com) with an indication of your proposed format (individual paper, panel, roundtable, etc.).  If you are submitting a proposal for a panel, please include an abstract for each paper (up to 300 words each). Please indicate if you would like your paper to be considered for the edited volume that will be published after the conference.

Deadline for submissions: January 31st 2017

Conference Organisers: Dr Emma Newport (University of Sussex) and Amy Murat (King’s College London)

For enquiries regarding the programme, please contact: e.newport@sussex.ac.uk
For all general enquiries, please contact: womenmoneymarkets@gmail.com

Follow this link to download the call for papers.

New Book: Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period

iap-irish-fine-art-cvr-screen-300x450

Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period edited by Jane Fenlon, Ruth Kenny, Caroline Pegum, and Brendan Rooney presents the finest contemporary research on Irish fine art from the 17th and 18th centuries. The contributors, both established and emergent Irish art historians, approach the production and reception of fine art in this period with substantial new work on a wide range of fascinating themes.

Table of Contents:

  1. ‘Parliament as Theatre: Francis Wheatley’s The Irish House of Commons Revisited’, Fintan Cullen.
  2. ‘Theft, Concealment and Exposure: Nathaniel Hone’s The Spartan Boy’, William Laffan.
  3. ‘Commerce, Conquest and Change: Thomas Hickey’s John Mowbray, Calcutta Merchant,attended by a Banian and a Messenger’, Siobhan McDermott.
  4. ‘Artistic connections between Dublin and London in the early-Georgian period: James Latham and Joseph Highmore’, Jacqueline Riding.
  5. ‘The “Strange and Unaccountable” John Van Nost: The Making of a Sculptural Career in Eighteenth-Century Ireland’, M.G. Sullivan.
  6. ‘An Irish Teniers? The Development of Paintings of Everyday Life in Ireland,c.1780–c.1810’, Mary Jane Boland.
  7. ‘The Portrait Collection in the Great Hall of the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin’, Jane Fenlon.
  8. ‘The Contribution of Foreign Artists to Cultural Life in Eighteenth-Century Dublin’, Nicola Figgis.
  9. ‘Visualising the Privileged Status of Motherhood: The Commemoration of Women in Irish Funerary Monuments, c.1600-c.1650’, Elaine Hoysted.

For further information, follow this link to visit the Irish Academic Press website.

 

Events: Newbridge House Study Day, 8 Nov. 2016.

Newbridge House by Janet Finlay Cobbe, née Grahame (1826-1884), c.1860, watercolour on paper, Cobbe collection no.205
Newbridge House by Janet Finlay Cobbe, née Grahame (1826-1884), c.1860, watercolour on paper, Cobbe collection no.205

The Irish Georgian Society and Fingal County Council, in collaboration with the Cobbe family, are partnering to deliver a study day which will examine the history and conservation of Newbridge’s architecture, designed landscape, decorative interiors and collection.

Speakers will include: Alec Cobbe, Cathal Dowd Smith, Dr Arthur MacGregor, Dr Anthony Malcomson, Fionnuala May, Una Ni Mhearain, Professor Finola O’ Kane Crimmins, David Skinner, Dr Adriaan Waiboer and Professor David Watkin.

Attendance fee is €90 to include lunch.  Bookings can be made through the Irish Georgian Society, 58 South William Street, Dublin 2.

T: 01 6798675.
E: info@igs.ie W:http://www.igs.ie/uploads/Final_Newbridge_Programme_for_web_HR.pdf

CFP Reminder: The Irish and the London Stage

Please note the Call for Papers for the conference on ‘The Irish and the London Stage: Identity, Culture, and Politics, 1680-1830’ to be held at Trinity College Dublin, 17-18 February 2017 is closing on 30 September.

Keynote speakers: Professor Helen Burke (Florida State) and Professor Felicity Nussbaum (UCLA)

Further details here: https://londonirishtheatreblog.wordpress.com/

CFP: Papers for the 2017 ASECS conference

The 2017 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference will be held in Minneapolis (MN), from March 30 – April 2; for more information, please see https://asecs.press.jhu.edu/general%20site/Final%202017%20Call%20for%20Papers%20edited.pdf.

The Irish Caucus will be organizing two panels at the annual ASECS meeting and an additional panel jointly with the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society.  Please see the descriptions of these panels below and consider proposing a paper for one of them.  Graduate students and junior scholars are especially encouraged to submit proposals.

 

Irish Caucus Panel 1: “The Irish Enlightenment IX”

(Irish Caucus; Scott Breuninger; University of South Dakota; Email: Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu)

Over the past decade, scholars of the Enlightenment have increasingly recognized the contributions of Ireland to broader strands of eighteenth-century thought and the place of Irish thinkers’ work within the context of European and Atlantic intellectual movements.  This research has spawned an increasing number of essays, books, and conference panels, illustrating the vitality of debate concerning the Irish dimension of the Enlightenment and collectively helping to define the nature of the Irish Enlightenment.  This panel welcomes participants whose work focuses on Irish thought and/or its relationship to the Enlightenment world, especially papers that utilize new methodological approaches to the study of intellectual history; including (but not limited to) models drawn from the digital humanities, global history, and/or gender studies.  If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Scott Breuninger (Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu) by September 15, 2016.

 

Irish Caucus Panel 2: “Aesthetics and Politics in Eighteenth-Century Ireland”

(Irish Caucus; Scott Breuninger; University of South Dakota; Email: Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu)

During the eighteenth century, questions of aesthetics in Ireland were often linked to notions of political or social authority.  Working in a society divided by religion, gender, and race, Irish artists were faced with the uncomfortably stark nature of political power and the (mis-)attribution of meaning(s) to their work.  In this context, many of the themes explored by Irish poets, playwrights, and musicians (among others) were necessarily grounded in discourses that tried to walk a fine line between personal expression and social expectations.  Some of these creative works explicitly drew from Ireland’s past to inform their meaning, others looked toward the future with varying degrees of optimism and pessimism.  In this nexus of aesthetic creativity, artists were forced to negotiate with a wide range of pressures that were unique to Hibernia.

 

This panel welcomes proposals that address how issues of artistic representation related to questions of political and social power within eighteenth-century Ireland.  Of particular interest are proposals that investigate how politically disenfranchised groups in Ireland addressed the connection between artistic representation, political power, and/or historical memory along lines associated with religion, gender, and race  If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Scott Breuninger (Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu) by September 15, 2016.

 

Joint Irish Studies/Scottish Studies Panel: “New Directions in Irish and Scottish Studies”
(Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society and Irish Studies Caucus) Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University; E-mail: leith@sfu.ca

The nations which we now know as Ireland and Scotland have a long history of connection and conflict dating back to prehistoric times when, as Tom Devine puts it, the two formed a “single cultural, religious, linguistic and economic zone” (3). It was only in the late 1990’s, however, in the context of the growing political strength of the Scottish devolution movement and the gains of the peace process in Northern Ireland, that academics working in Irish Studies and Scottish Studies began to look at connections between their fields of inquiry. Putting Irish Studies and Scottish Studies in dialogue with one another has had important implications, although it has also revealed some limitations. This panel invites scholars to reflect on the scholarly dialogue between Irish and Scottish studies either in the past or present. Submissions may consider new theoretical perspectives and/or examine specific textual or historical examples of connections between Ireland and Scotland. If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Leith Davis (leith@sfu.ca) by September 15, 2016.

 

Additional Irish-Themed Panel for ASECS

“The Ulster Scots in Ireland and North America”

David Clare, National University of Ireland, Galway

Email: DClare1@eircom.net

The Ulster Scots are an ethnic group descended from the Scottish people who settled in the North of Ireland during the reign of King James I. Today, they play an important role in Northern Irish political life and possess a vibrant, unique culture which is currently experiencing a revival. In the eighteenth century, the Ulster Scots emigrated in great numbers to North America, and, in the United States (where they became known as the “Scotch-Irish”), they contributed greatly to the development of American music, handicrafts, and political values. Despite their considerable impact on Irish and North American life, the Ulster Scots remain an under-regarded Irish subculture. For example, the excellent, eighteenth-century Rhyming Weaver poets are routinely omitted from “definitive” anthologies of Irish literature. Likewise, the Ulster Scots role in the 1798 Rebellion and their post-Rebellion transition to diehard British loyalty warrants further study. And there are still gaps in our understanding of the deep imprint that the Ulster Scots made on American politics and culture in the decades following their arrival. As such, this panel solicits papers which explore the impact of the Ulster Scots on Irish and/or North American political and cultural life in the long eighteenth-century.

If interested in this panel, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to David Clare (DClare1@eircom.net) by 15 September 2016.

 

 

CFP: The Irish and the London Stage

cropped-a-player-in-london-dublin_1786

Proposals for papers are now being invited for a conference entitled ‘The Irish and the London Stage: Identity, Culture, and Politics, 1680-1830’ which will take place in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin on 17-18 February 2017.

The conference will consider the varied Irish contribution to the development of London’s theatrical world over the course of the eighteenth century.  This event is generously supported by the Marie-Curie programme.

Please visit the conference website for further information.

Call For Papers: Jonathan Swift 350

A conference to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift will be held from 7-9 June 2017 in Trinity College Dublin.

Proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of Jonathan Swift’s life and work are invited, with papers on Swift and Ireland particularly welcome. Suggestions for round tables (including names of participants) will also be considered. Please send titles and abstracts (200 words) to the conference organizers at:

Registration for 2016 ECIS Annual Conference Now Open!

The 2016 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society  / An Cumann Éire San Ochtú Céad Déag Annual Conference will be held in National University of Ireland Galway on 10 – 11 June 2016. 

Plenaries will be delivered by Prof. Michael Brown (Aberdeen), Prof. Norma Clark (Kingston), and Dr Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail (UCD).

Registration is now open. Go to http://www.ecis.ie/annual-conference/ for further details.

Conference: Women’s Networks in Eighteenth-Century London and Dublin

The Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, Queen’s University Belfast is hosting a conference entitled ‘Women’s Networks in Eighteenth-Century London and Dublin’ which will take place at the Music Building, University Square, Old McMordie Hall on Friday 27 May 2016.

Please follow this link to download the full programme.

Conference: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Image from Splendor Solis, BL

A one-day conference, ‘Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland’, will be held in honour of Anne Laurence on 4 June 2016 at the Institute of Historical Research, London.

Speakers will include: Prof. James Daybell, Dr Amy Erickson, Dr Gemma Allen, Prof. Mary O’Dowd, Dr Frances Nolan, Dr Rosalind Carr, Prof. Jane Humphries, Dr Judith Spicksley and Dr Amanda Capern.

Further details are available at http://www.open.ac.uk/blogs/history/

Events: Irish Protestant Playwrights Conference

purgatory

The Irish Protestant Playwrights Conference, will be held at the Moore Institute, NUI Galway on 1-3 June 2016.

The conference will feature papers on a number of dramatists from the long eighteenth-century, including George Farquhar, Charles Macklin, Arthur Murphy, Elizabeth Griffith, Oliver Goldsmith, various Sheridans (to be precise, Thomas, Jr., Frances, and Richard Brinsley), and Maria Edgeworth.

Keynote speakers will include Professor Seán Kennedy (St Mary’s University, Halifax) and Dr Emilie Pine (UCD).

Further details about this event can be found on the Irish Protestant Playwrights website.