ECIS Postgrad Bursary Winner: Kristina Decker

Kristina Decker is a PhD researcher at University College Cork. Her research explores women and the culture of Improvement in Eighteenth-Century Ireland. Her broader interests include women’s history and the cultural history of the long eighteenth century, country house and material culture studies, and animal histories. She will be speaking about her research at the ECIS Annual Conference on 17-18 June 2022. You can follow her on Twitter @kristina_decker

Favourite archive:
The British Library practically feels like a second home, but I also love the National Library of Wales where I was able to sift through boxes of uncatalogued materials relating to Mary Delany’s family.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
The V&A because of its amazing textile collections. Also the Sir John Soane Museum, National Portrait Gallery, and Delany’s ‘Paper Mosaicks’ at the British Museum

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
The Duchess of Portland’s Bulstrode Park

Best online resource:
ECCO and Elizabeth Montagu Correspondence Online (EMCO

Best book of 18th century interest:
Amanda Vickery’s The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England and Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
It has to be Mary Delany!

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?
My PhD thesis, titled ‘Women and Improvement in Eighteenth-Century Ireland: the Case of Mary Delany’, explores the many ways in which Mary Delany participated in the culture of improvement during the time that she lived in Ireland, including such areas as education, sociability, landscape, and female ‘accomplishments’. At the 2022 ECIS conference I will be examining Mary Delany’s sketches and written descriptions of her house, Delville, and the wider landscape of Glasnevin, Co Dublin. My paper will explore Mary Delany’s discussion of the Irish landscape and how it reflected her other interests – particularly the culture of Improvement – and, ultimately, how she used these discussions to navigate and situate herself within the Irish landscape.

ECIS Postgrad Bursary Winner: Andrew Dorman

Andrew Dorman is a doctoral candidate in the DCU School of History and Geography. His research considers the soldier’s experience in eighteenth-century Ireland. He will be speaking about his research at the ECIS Annual Conference on 17-18 June 2022. You can follow him on Twitter @andydormann.

Favourite archive:
The National Army Museum in Chelsea. My inner 9-year-old appreciates an archive with a tank in the car park.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Hôtel National des Invalides in Paris. My inner 9-year-old also appreciates a museum with a tank in the car park

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
Dublin City, at any given moment. Exciting? Certainly. Safe? Certainly not.

Best online resource:
The Irish Newspaper Archives, and their British equivalent

Best book of 18th century interest:
Based on my research interests, J.A. Houlding’s Fit for Service or Ilya Berkovich’s Motivation in War.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Every figure I study seems repugnant, but if I had to choose one, I’d say King George II. Might as well start at the top and work down!

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?

My research explores the experience of soldiering in Ireland in the eighteenth century, examining the army-societal relationship and the unique challenges presented by deployment in Ireland. It moves military history away from the battlefield and instead looks at the social dynamics of Irish service, such as diet, relationship with the wider population, housing, protest and more.

The paper I will be presenting will explore the phenomena of recruitment and desertion in the army in Ireland in the eighteenth century. It will consider the pattern and practice of recruiting, and the creative ways by which junior officers circumvented anti-Irish recruiting legislation in a bid to keep their regiments fully manned. In addition, it shall distinguish between Protestant and Catholic recruitment and trace the contributions of these groups to the military throughout the entire century. The antithesis of recruitment was desertion, and most histories of the army in Ireland argue that soldiers based on the island were more likely to desert. My paper aims to challenge this traditional narrative and evaluate how serious an issue this was for the army in Ireland in the eighteenth century.

ECIS Postgrad Bursary Winner: Maria Zukovs

Maria Zukovs is a PhD Candidate at the University of St Andrews. Her research explores Dublin press coverage of the French Revolution and the impact it had on contemporaneous society, culture and politics. She will be speaking about her research at the ECIS Annual Conference on 17-18 June 2022. You can follow her on Twitter @m_zukovs.

Favourite archive:
The pandemic has made accessing archives difficult and I have done a good portion of my work using online resources. The British Library, however, provided me the first opportunity to work with physical copies of the newspapers I study, which was a really special experience.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
I don’t think I can choose just one, it is a tie between the memorial of the Battle of Waterloo, Titanic Belfast or the National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology.

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I would have to say the French Revolution, especially around the initial outbreak in June 1789. It would have been fascinating to be a fly on the wall when the Tennis Court Oath was sworn.

Best online resource:
As someone whose primarily field is book history, the English Short Title Catalogue (ESTC) is the resource I consult most often.

Best book of 18th century interest:
Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley. As a fan of Austen’s work I was intrigued by the approach Worsley took in looking at her life through the houses she lived in. I was not disappointed and I think I read it in about 2 days.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
It would have to be either William Drennan or Olympe de Gouges.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?
My PhD research focuses on Dublin press coverage of the French Revolution between 1788 and 1794. I study both independently-run and government-funded newspapers to understand what, if any, impact the French Revolution had on Dublin society, culture and politics at that time. My project seeks to understand the amount and scope of French Revolutionary news disseminated in Dublin in the early years of the Revolution. Using newspapers as my main primary source allows me to look beyond well-studied figures like Theobald Wolfe Tone and organisations like the Society of United Irishmen and focus more on individuals who have not been the subject of in-depth study. The paper I will be presenting looks at the sources that provided news of the French Revolution to the Dublin press. It will specifically be challenging some long-held notions that much of the foreign news in Irish newspapers was directly copied from London newspapers. Instead, an independent infrastructure allowed news to move between France and Ireland. Ireland had a robust trade with France and there were large communities of French Protestants in Dublin and Irish Catholics in France. Numerous instances exist of newspapers reprinting letters sent from people in France, providing eyewitness account of the Revolution, to their ‘friend in Dublin’. This furthers our understanding of how news moved throughout Europe at a time of significant political change and how news of the French Revolution was able to permeate other nations.

ECIS Postgrad Bursary Winner: Eliza Spakman

Eliza Spakman is Research MA student in Literary Studies at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Her research explores Late Eighteenth-Century Women’s writing, specifically Maria Edgeworth. Her wider interests include the Irish Enlightenment, Female Enlightenment thinking and networks, the Bluestocking circle, and Mary Wollstonecraft. She also wrote a paper on the Great Frost last year in affiliation with the ‘Heritages of Hunger’ project. She loves intellectual history as much as literary studies, secretly. She will be speaking about her research at the ECIS Annual Conference on 17-18 June 2022. You can follow her on Twitter @elizastudying.

Favourite archive:
As an MA student outside of Ireland and the UK, I unfortunately do not have access to many archives, so I do not yet have a fervent favourite, but based on the sources I have used, it would have to be the NLI or the Bodleian Library!

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Within the Netherlands, the Mauritshuis in The Hague which displays a lot of lovely Golden Age art (Rembrandt, Vermeer, Potter, etc.). Outside the Netherlands, the British Museum, which has something for every mood I could possibly be in.

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I would have to say the 1790s in London or Dublin. It is the period that first got me passionate about the eighteenth century because it is such a turbulent time with so many ideas, opinions, etc. floating around.

Best online resource:
I am going to be boring and say ECCO, which was especially helpful when I was writing a paper on the Great Frost last year!

Best book of 18th century interest:
I like Roy Porter’s Enlightenment, but also Amanda Vickery’s The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England. And of Irish interest, I really enjoyed Claire Connolly’s A Cultural History of the Irish Novel, 1790-1829. Sorry, that’s three.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Obviously, Maria Edgeworth. There are so many ideas about what she thought and believed, but I would love to know what she is like as a person!

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?
My paper for the ECIS 2022 conference is based on the first chapter of the dissertation I am writing for my Research MA (though in terms of requirements, the dissertation is more like an MPhil one) on masculinity in the works of Maria Edgeworth. This topic has been studied very little even though masculinity was central to many aspects of eighteenth-century society, from politeness and morality to national identity and politics, and can therefore give us a different perspective on Edgeworth’s works and ideas. My paper is specifically about ‘Forester’, one of Edgeworth’s Moral Tales, which tells the story of a young man who is very sceptical about contemporary social norms and gentlemanliness. Because he is so sceptical, the tale addresses not only what it means to be a good man, but also why. My paper will thus look at what the ideal man is according to this story, and how it engages with contemporary debates surrounding masculinity, particularly those surrounding politeness and primitivism. ‘Forester’ is far from a boring didactic tale, but rather a complex one, that touches on many things Edgeworth felt very passionate about, amongst which, being a proper man and what that looks like, but also empathy, the power of the printing press, and obviously education.

ECIS Postgrad Bursary Winner: Elisa Cozzi

Photo portrait of Elisa Cozzi

Elisa Cozzi is a DPhil Candidate in English Language and Literature, The Queen’s College, University of Oxford. Her research explores the literary connections between Italy and Ireland in the Romantic Period. Her broader interests include Irish Romanticism, the Byron-Shelley circle, Anglo-Italian literature, the novel, European literary coteries in the long eighteenth century, and poetics of exile and national identity. She will be speaking about her research at the ECIS Annual Conference on 17-18 June 2022. You can follow her on Twitter @_ElisaCozzi.

Favourite archive:
Probably the Weston Library (part of the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford) so far, but I’m heading to the Pforzheimer Collection, New York Public Library, in a few months and have heard that that’s phenomenal, so this preference might change soon.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Newstead Abbey, the Uffizi, the Dublin Writers Museum, Chawton House, Tate Britain, the Pinacoteca di Brera.

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I will have to say Pisa, Italy, in 1820, just after the Shelleys moved there (the ‘long’ eighteenth century, right?). Or Lady Moira’s salon in Dublin in the late 1790s.

Best online resource:
The Shelley-Godwin Archive, Jane Austen’s Fiction Manuscripts Digital Edition, William Godwin’s Diary, Romantic Europe: The Virtual Exhibition (RÊVE).

Best book of 18th century interest:
Again, not quite eighteenth-century, but Will Bower’s The Italian Idea: Anglo-Italian Radical Literary Culture, 1815-1823 is a fantastic work that had a huge impact on me. I should also mention Claire Connolly’s A Cultural History of the Irish Novel, 1790-1828 and Katie Trumpener’s Bardic Nationalism.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
There are very few things I wouldn’t do in exchange for a pint of Guinness with Margaret King Mount Cashell. I could also do with a coffee with Germaine de Stael in Paris or a glass of local red with Ugo Foscolo in the Euganean Hills.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?
My paper presents the first in-depth study of the unpublished historical novel North and South; or, the Chieftains of Erin, a Historical Romance of the Days of Queen Elizabeth by the Irish radical writer—and former pupil of Mary Wollstonecraft—Margaret King, Lady Mount Cashell (1773-1835). Thirty years before Walter Scott popularised the genre, Mount Cashell started her historical novel (set in sixteenth-century Ireland on the cusp of the Tudor conquest) in Dublin in the 1790s, when she became involved in Irish revolutionary politics and actively campaigned against the Act of Union. She then interrupted it and resumed it in Pisa, Italy, where she settled in voluntary exile and befriended the Shelley Circle in the 1820s. Mount Cashell’s transnational historical fiction originated at the crossroads of post-Union Ireland and pre-Unification Italy, at a crucial period in the development of the novel as a literary form. First discovered in a private Italian archive in the 1990s, the Chieftains of Erin manuscripts had never been thoroughly examined by literary scholars. My paper will situate Mount Cashell’s work in the field of Eighteenth-century Irish Studies and shed light on neglected Anglo-Irish-Italian literary networks in the early nineteenth century.

CFP: Irish Literature and Periodical Culture Conference

The Irish Literature and Periodical Culture Conference will take place in KU Leuven on 1-3 December 2022.

Periodicals have played an important role in the production, mediation, dissemination and reception of Irish literature. By exploring the intersections between Irish writers and the (transnational) periodical press, this conference aims to further scrutinise the ways in which periodical culture in Ireland has impacted writers’ careers, codified the development of literary genres and conventions, and influenced the course of Irish literary history and the canon more generally.

Confirmed plenary speakers will include Professor Frank Shovlin (University of Liverpool), Professor Fionnuala Dillane (University College Dublin) and Professor Stephanie Rains (Maynooth University).

For further information and the call for papers, visit the conference website.

New book: Politics and political culture in Ireland from Restoration to Union 1660-1800

Politics and political culture in Ireland from Restoration to Union, 1660-1800
Essays in honour of Jacqueline R. Hill
Raymond Gillespie, James Kelly & Mary Ann Lyons, editors
Political culture is not an idea that many historians of Ireland have engaged with, preferring more straightforward ways of thinking about the distribution of political power through institutions such as the vice regal court, parliament or the law. The essays in this volume take an organic approach to the way in which power is made manifest and distributed across the social world, considering such diverse themes as the role of political life in identity formation and maintenance, civic unity and the problem of urban poverty in Dublin, the role of money in the exercise of authority by Dublin Corporation, public ritual and ceremony in political culture, rumour and rancour in provincial Ireland, the public and the growth of Dublin city, and the Belfast/Bordeaux merchant, John Black III’s vision of Belfast society in the era of improvement. By focusing on the idea of political cultures and how they intersected with more formal political structures, these essays reveal new and unexpected disjunctions that contemporaries were well aware of, and carefully managed, but which have been marginalized by historians. This volume resituates power where it was exercised on a daily basis and in doing so opens fascinating windows into past worlds in pre-modern Ireland. 

Editors: Raymond Gillespie & Mary Ann Lyons teach in the Department of History, MU. James Kelly teaches in the Department of History, DCU.

Contributors: Toby Barnard, Vincent Comerford, Bernadette Cunningham, Raymond Gillespie, David Hayton, James Kelly, Colm Lennon, Mary Ann Lyons, Brendan Twomey and Jonathan Wright.

Full list of Contents: https://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/new-year-folder/new-politics-and-political-culture-in-ireland-from-restoration-to-union-1660-1800/contents

Four Courts Press. 256pp. Hardback. 978-1-84682-974-1  €55.00
https://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/new-year-folder/new-politics-and-political-culture-in-ireland-from-restoration-to-union-1660-1800/

Available Now

Statement for Ukraine

We have been asked by the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, of which we are an affiliate Society, to circulate the  ‘Statement for Ukraine’ below.


Dear ISECS National Society representatives / cher.ères représentant.e.s des sociétés nationales de la SIEDS,

[Le message en français suivra]

I write on behalf of Penelope Corfield, ISECS President. We have drafted the following statement, following consultation with our Executive Committee. We would appreciate if you could circulate it, display it on your websites, share it on social media, and draw public attention to it by any means available.

As President of the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, on behalf of all our members, I express our total support for the people of Ukraine, its Universities, our Ukrainian colleagues who join us in eighteenth-century studies, and all Ukrainian-born colleagues and students everywhere, in their just resistance to armed invasion. Signed: Penelope J. Corfield.

The statement has already been posted on the ISECS website, as well as our Twitter account, should you wish to share it (the post can be found at https://twitter.com/isecs_sieds/status/1497682146470858757).

Thank you, and best wishes,

Nelson Guilbert

ISECS Communications Secretary

[Français]

Je vous écris de la part de Penelope Corfield, Présidente de la SIEDS. Nous avons préparé la déclaration suivante, en consultation avec notre comité exécutif. Nous vous serions reconnaissants de bien vouloir le diffuser, de l’afficher sur vos sites internet et vos médias sociaux, et d’attirer l’attention du public par tout moyen qui vous semble opportun.

À titre de Présidente de la Société internationale d’étude du dix-huitième siècle, et au nom de tous nos membres, j’exprime notre soutien inconditionnel au peuple de l’Ukraine, à ses universités, à nos collègues de la société ukrainienne d’étude du dix-huitième siècle, et à tous nos collègues et étudiants d’origine ukrainienne à travers le monde, dans leur juste résistance face à l’invasion armée. Signé, Penelope J. Corfield.

Nous avons déjà diffusé la déclaration sur le site internet de la SIEDS, ainsi que sur notre fil Twitter, si vous souhaitez la partager (la publication se trouve à l’adresse suivante : https://twitter.com/isecs_sieds/status/1497682215618109442).

Merci, et bien cordialement,

Nelson Guilbert

Secrétaire aux communications de la SIEDS

New Book: Politics and Political Culture in Ireland

Image of cover of Politics and political culture in Ireland

Politics and political culture in Ireland from Restoration to Union, 1660-1800
Essays in honour of Jacqueline R. Hill
Raymond Gillespie, James Kelly & Mary Ann Lyons, editors

Political culture is not an idea that many historians of Ireland have engaged with, preferring more straightforward ways of thinking about the distribution of political power through institutions such as the vice regal court, parliament or the law. The essays in this volume take an organic approach to the way in which power is made manifest and distributed across the social world, considering such diverse themes as the role of political life in identity formation and maintenance, civic unity and the problem of urban poverty in Dublin, the role of money in the exercise of authority by Dublin Corporation, public ritual and ceremony in political culture, rumour and rancour in provincial Ireland, the public and the growth of Dublin city, and the Belfast/Bordeaux merchant, John Black III’s vision of Belfast society in the era of improvement. By focusing on the idea of political cultures and how they intersected with more formal political structures, these essays reveal new and unexpected disjunctions that contemporaries were well aware of, and carefully managed, but which have been marginalized by historians. This volume resituates power where it was exercised on a daily basis and in doing so opens fascinating windows into past worlds in pre-modern Ireland. 

Contributors: Toby Barnard, Vincent Comerford, Bernadette Cunningham, Raymond Gillespie, David Hayton, James Kelly, Colm Lennon, Mary Ann Lyons, Brendan Twomey and Jonathan Wright.

Raymond Gillespie & Mary Ann Lyons 
teach in the Department of History, MU. James Kelly teaches in the Department of History, DCU.
Four Courts Press. 256pp. Hardback. 978-1-84682-974-1  €55.00

Visit the Four Courts Press website for more information:
https://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/new-year-folder/new-politics-and-political-culture-in-ireland-from-restoration-to-union-1660-1800/

ECIS Annual Conference Bursaries

The Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society/An Cumann Éire san Ochtú Aois Déag is pleased to invite applications for 3 postgraduate bursaries for its annual conference in University College Cork, 17-18 June 2022. The bursaries will cover conference registration fees and attendance at the conference dinner. The deadline for applications is 31 March. Application forms should be sent to the Society President, Prof Aileen Douglas ([email protected]) and applicants should also request their referee to send a reference to the same address on or before 31 March. Please note that applicants must also submit their paper proposal to Dr Clíona Ó Gallchoir ([email protected]), and that successful applicants should have a current ECIS membership at the time of the conference.

For more information visit our Annual Conference page.

Special offer on Dickson, The First Irish Cities

Members of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society are invited to partake of a special offer on David Dickson, The First Irish Cities. An Eighteenth-Century Transformation, Yale University Press, 9780300229462, hb, 65 illustrations, 352 pages.

The book is now on offer to members of the Society for €25.00 post free within Ireland.

Email Robert Towers, Publishers’ Agent, at [email protected] or telephone 01 2806 532 to avail of this offer.

Events: Commerce, Experiment, Innovation & the Arts online symposium

Maynooth University and the Irish Georgian Society are partnering to deliver a live online symposium, ‘Speculative Minds: Commerce, Experiment, Innovation & the Arts in Georgian Ireland‘ on Thursday 27th May 2021. The symposium has been convened by Dr Toby Barnard, Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford University and Dr Alison FitzGerald, Associate Professor, Maynooth University.

Further information, including the symposium programme, is available from the Irish Georgian Society website.

A. C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship

Joel W. Herman has been awarded the A. C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship for 2021 by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS). The award will assist Mr. Herman, a Ph.D. student in history at Trinity College Dublin, in producing his thesis on “Revolutionary Currents: Ideas, Information, and the Imperial Public Spheres in Dublin and New York, 1776-1782″.

The Fellowship was endowed by the renowned independent scholar A.C. Elias Jr (1944-2008). It offers US$2,500 per annum to support “documentary scholarship on Ireland in the period between the Treaty of Limerick (1691) and the Act of Union (1800), by enabling North American-based scholars to travel to Ireland and Irish-based scholars to travel to North America for furthering their research.”

Projects conducting original research on any aspect of eighteenth-century Ireland qualify for consideration, but recipients must be members of ASECS who have permanent residence in the United States or Canada or be members of its Irish sister organization, The Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society, residing in Ireland.

More information Mr. Herman’s project and details of the 2022 Fellowship Competition are available from the Marsh’s Library website.

Funding: 2020 Desmond Guinness Scholarship

The Desmond Guinness Scholarship 2020 is currently open for applications.

The scholarship is awarded annually by the Irish Georgian Society to an applicant or applicants engaged in research on the visual arts of Ireland including the work of Irish architects, artists and craftsmen, material culture and design history, 1600-1940.

Applications must be submitted by 2pm, Monday 30 November 2020.

More information is available on the Irish Georgian Society website, at this link.

Event: Eighteenth-Century Urban Cultures Workshop

The Eighteenth-Century Urban Cultures Workshop will take place at Queen’s University Belfast on Thursday 27 February 2020, from 10.00-17.30.

Speakers will include: Moyra Haslett (QUB), Jonathan Wright (Maynooth), Sarah McCleave (QUB), Ruth Thorpe (QUB) and Leonie Hannan (QUB), with a keynote lecture presented by Alison Fitzgerald (Maynooth).

For more information and to register, visit: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/urban-cultures-in-the-eighteenth-century-tickets-90634659707

Events: ‘Rags, Riches and Recycling’

A talk entitled ‘”Rags, Riches and Recycling”; the Dublin Society’s encouragement of Art & Artefacts, 1731-1881’ by Dr Claudia Kinmonth MRIA will take place at 7.30pm, 23rd Jan 2020 at R.S.A.I. 63 Merrion Square S. Dublin 8.

This richly illustrated talk presents the findings of Kinmonth’s 2018 ‘Library & Archives research Bursary’ at the Royal Dublin Society. She researched the first fifty years of the Dublin Society’s existence; using their manuscripts together with their collection of art, sculpture and furniture, to reveal how they boosted ‘Poor Ireland’s’ material culture. They advertised prizes for eg drawing and sculpture, for planting trees, for manufacturing such things as salt, glue, paper or gold lace (which previously had been imported), and their ‘premiums’ helped the working poor and their children. Themes emerge about eg the barter of china for rags, the recycling of rags into paper, re-use of gold lace for re-smelting into jewellery, and the names and appearance of individuals rewarded for inventions. This work is published as an article in ‘Irish Architectural and Decorative Studies’ Vol. XXI (2018).

New recording of The Jubilee

Theatrical works in the eighteenth-century did not play for continuous ‘runs’ in the manner of modern popular theatre. The key figure is the number of performances in a particular season, making the most successful theatrical work of the British eighteenth century David Garrick’s The Jubilee, with music by Charles Dibdin, which played for 91 performances in the 1769-70 season.

To mark the 250th anniversary of this important musical play, Retrospect Opera has released a recording which includes all the sung music and a good deal of the spoken dialogue. For more information visit:  http://www.retrospectopera.org.uk/CD_SALES/CD_details_Jubilee.html

The Jubilee is a comic representation of Garrick’s Shakespeare ‘Jubilee’ of 1769, a 3-day festival in Stratford-upon-Avon that famously ended up getting washed out, but which achieved unprecedented publicity and represents a milestone in the history of Shakespeare’s reception. It deifies Shakespeare, but at the same time gently pokes fun at the fashion for literary tourism that the festival did so much to promote.

The central character is an Irishman who has traveled all the way to Stratford to see the Jubilee, but who falls asleep at the wrong time, and misses the grand Shakespeare pageant. Dibdin’s songs are richly melodic and extremely memorable, and several of them, celebrating Shakespeare as a sort of folk hero (‘The lad of all lads was a Warwickshire lad’!), enjoyed a long cultural afterlife. 

The Jubilee should be essential listening for anyone interested in the ‘god of our idolatry’ idea of Shakespeare that Garrick bequeathed to the Romantics, and representations of the Irish on the English stage.

Retrospect Opera is constituted as a charity so all profits from the sale of The Jubilee go directly towards making more such recordings possible.

Events: SWIFT AND GEORGIAN DUBLIN

As part of the Jonathan Swift Festival, four leading experts on Swift will present short papers (each of 20 minutes’ duration) on aspects of the great man’s life, writings, and relationships.

Time: 2.00 pm – 5.00 pm

Date: Saturday, 23 November 2019

Location: Marsh’s Library, St Patrick’s Close, Dublin D08 FK79.

Programme

2.00 – 2.15. Welcome by Dr. Bob Mahony of the Swift Foundation, USA.

2.15 – 3.45. Presentations:

‘Swift’s Lost Works and the Confessional State in Queen Anne’s Reign’, by Prof. Ian Higgins (Australian National University, Canberra).

‘Swift in 1719’, by Prof. Norma Clarke (University of Richmond, London).

‘Jonathan Swift and the Pursuit of Happiness’, by Prof. Melinda Rabb (Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA).

‘Swift and Gibbon’, by Prof. Jenny Davidson (Columbia University, New York, USA),

3.45 – 4.00. Break

4.00 – 4.20. Response to the four papers by Dr. Nathalie Zimpfer (Université de Paris IV, France).

4.20 – 4.50. Questions and contributions from the audience

5.00 – 6.00. Reception in Marsh’s Library sponsored by the Swift Foundation.

This event is free of charge and open to the public. No advance booking is necessary.

See www.marshlibrary.ie/swift2019/


New Resource: Censorship of British Theatre website

ECIS members may be interested in the new web resource ‘The Censorship of British Theatre, 1737-1843’, available at https://tobeomitted.tcd.ie

The website explores the topic of theatre censorship in Britain 1737-1843. It hosts 40 carefully selected play manuscripts submitted to the Examiner of Plays who had the primary responsibility of safeguarding the morals of theatre audiences after the passage of the Stage Licensing Act of 1737. The manuscripts are drawn from the Larpent Collection (Huntington Library, Los Angeles) and the Lord Chamberlain’s Plays (British Library, London) and have been carefully selected to show the variety of reasons a play might be deemed inappropriate through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Each manuscript is accompanied by an author bio, plot synopsis, reception history, and commentary on the censorship. The editorial apparatus amounts to 95,000 words in total.

Specifically of interest to ECIS members is the inclusion of a number of Irish playwrights and/or plays of Irish interest. These include Thomas Moore, MP; or, The Bluestocking (1811); Elizabeth Griffith, The Platonic Wife (1765); Charles Macklin, Covent Garden Theatre (1752) and The Man of the World (1770); John O’Keeffe, Quarter Day (1800); Anon. Fingal; or, Erin Delivered (1813); Anon. Giovanni in Ireland (1821); and, Joseph Stirling Coyne, The Humours of an Election (1837).

Events: Transformation of Rathfarnham Castle

The conference, ‘Transformation: From Fortified House to Georgian Villa’, will take place at Rathfarnham Castle on 4-5 October 2019. This event will feature a range of speakers discussing the transformation of the building into a fashionable villa in the eighteenth century.

For further information, download the full conference programme here.

A limited number of tickets priced €25/€15 are available at eventbrite.ie (search for ‘Rathfarnham Castle’).

Discount Code: Yale University Press

Yale University Press have recently published some new titles (listed below) that may be of interest to members of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society. These titles are available to members at a 30% discount until 31 October 2019. The discount code is Y2009 and should be entered at the check out on the Yale University Press UK website.

Follow the links below for further information about each title:

Funding opportunity: Keogh-Naughton Library Research Award

The Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies and Notre Dame International are pleased to announce the continuation of the Keough-Naughton Library Research Award in Irish Studies. The award provides grant funding to assist scholars who travel to use the collections of the Hesburgh Libraries for research in all aspects of Irish studies.

The Irish Studies collections of the Hesburgh Libraries, primarily print, include a wide-ranging fiction collection, a strong seventeenth- and eighteenth-century print book collection, and collections on Berkeley, Burke and Swift. Lists and descriptions may be found in the research guide, Irish Studies Resources for Graduate Research, and on the Rare Books and Special Collections website.

The award is intended to defray the cost of travel and accommodation for research visits of one to three weeks in duration. The value of the award is normally between $1,500 and $4,000. Awardees may be established scholars, graduate students or postdoctoral scholars. Applications from international locations are encouraged. An important consideration will be the relevance of the Hesburgh Library collections to the proposed research project.

The anticipated time-frame for visits to the Libraries is between December 2019 and June 2020. Applications should be submitted by September 20, 2019. Recipients will be notified by early October.

For more information, please visit: https://irishstudies.nd.edu/news/new-application-cycle-for-the-keough-naughton-library-research-award-in-irish-studies-applications-due-sept-20-2019/

Funding Opportunity: Louth County Archives

Louth County Council invites proposals for research projects on the mercantile, industrial and commercial heritage of Co. Louth (using the Byrne Family of Allardstown as a focal point). Applicants should be suitably qualified researchers, including PhD students, historians, or archivists. Proposals from companies which provide research and writing services are also welcome.

For further information, please visit https://www.louthcoco.ie/en/louth_county_council/latest-news/mercantile-industrial-and-commercial-heritage-research-project.html

Introducing Project Erin: Thomas Moore in Europe

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ERIN documents two of Thomas Moore’s song series – the Irish Melodies (1808-1834) and National Airs (1818-1827) – as well as music inspired by his ‘oriental romance’ Lalla Rookh (1817). ERIN enables the user to track the production and dissemination of these works in Europe, from their respective dates of creation through to 1880. Any contributors to this process (composers, arrangers, editors, illustrators, engravers, publishers, etc.) are indexed or tagged as part of the project. All of ERIN’s resources are now available at www.erin.qub.ac.uk. This website unites the previously available blog and OMEKA resources with some new features, including podcasts and a catalogue that unites the collections of eight European repositories. ERIN was co-produced by Dr Tríona O’Hanlon (Dublin) and Dr Sarah McCleave (Queen’s University Belfast).

To complement ERIN’s launch, the exhibition, ‘Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe’ is on display at the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin from 17 June to 23 December 2019. ‘Discovering Thomas Moore’ is curated by Dr Sarah McCleave (Queen’s University Belfast). For further information about this exhibition and a series of complementary lectures on Thomas Moore, visit: https://www.ria.ie/discovering-thomas-moore-ireland-nineteenth-century-europe-0

CFP: EMBODYING ROMANTICISM

The fifth biennial conference of the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia will take place in Canberra, Australia on 21-23 November 2019.

The conference theme is ‘Embodying Romanticism’ and proposals are now invited for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers. Postgraduate bursaries are available.

See the conference website for the call for papers and further details:
https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa

New Books: Henry Redhead Yorke, Colonial Radical

A 20% discount for Amanda Goodrich’s new book, Henry Redhead Yorke, Colonial Radical Politics and Identity in the Atlantic World, 1772-1813 (Routledge, 2019) is now available.

This is the first biography of Henry Redhead Yorke, a West Indian of African/British descent. Born into a slave society in Barbuda but educated in Georgian England, he developed a complex identity to which politics was key. Yorke was radicalised in revolutionary Paris, became a citizen of the world and the most revolutionary radical in Britain between 1793–5. Imprisoned for his politics, Yorke recanted to loyalism but never lost his political zeal. This book raises important issues about political exclusion, the impact of ‘outsider’ politics in England, political apostasy and the complexities of politicisation and identity construction in the Atlantic World

A blog post about the book is now available at The Victorian Commons.

Follow this link to obtain the discount code and further information about this title.

DRI Early Career Research Award

Digital Repository of Ireland invite early career researchers to apply for a new annual Research Award. This Award grants a prize to an original short article or blog post summarising research informed in whole or in part by objects/collections deposited in DRI. Submissions will be assessed by a panel made up of DRI staff and an external judge, and the winner granted the bursary award of €500.

This Award is open to early career researchers in the areas of arts, humanities, social sciences and digital humanities, including (but not limited to)

  • Masters students
  • Those awarded a masters within the last two years
  • PhD students or those awarded a PhD within the last year 

For further information, please visit https://www.dri.ie/dri-research-award.

Seminar: The Irish to the Rescue

A seminar entitled ‘The Irish to the Rescue: the Tercentenary of the Polish Princess Clementina’s Escape’ will take place on 30 April in Europe House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2.

This event is organized on the occasion of the tercentenary of the rescue of the Polish Princess Maria Clementina Sobieska from captivity in Innsbruck in April 1719 by a small group of Irish people and one French woman in a most dramatic fashion.

The rescue itself will be retold and complemented by other perspectives offered by six world-class historians. The seminar will commence with an opening address by Professor Marian Lyons (NUIM) to be followed by papers from Dr Declan Downey (UCD), Dr Jarosław Pietrzak (University of Poznań), Dr Eamonn Ó Ciardha (UU), Dr Aneta Markuszewska (University of Warsaw), Professor Edward Corp (Université Toulouse), Dr Linda Kiernan (TCD), Richard Maher (Rathmines College / TU Dublin).

Tea and coffee will be provided during a short break between panels and wine will be offered at the closing of proceedings.

This example of Franco-Irish-Polish cooperation is generously sponsored by The Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Dublin; the Embassy of France in Ireland; the Alliance Française Dublin; Rathmines College of Further Education; The Technological University of Dublin.

This event is free to attend and you can reserve a seat by following the eventbrite link below:

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/the-irish-to-the-rescue-the-tercentenary-of-the-polish-princess-clementinas-escape-tickets-56482014225