DDFAS Talk at the RIA: Toile and Trouble

toile and trouble

Tomorrow evening in the Royal Irish Academy member’s room, John Gibson, Chairman of the Dublin Decorative and Fine Arts Society, will give a talk entitled ‘Toile and Trouble: The Story of Toile de Jouy’.

Ever since it’s invention by Francis Nixon in Drumcondra in 1752, Toile de Jouy has been more than just a home furnishing fabric. It has chronicled the leisure and interests of the bourgeoisie of the period, from the pastoral ideal of picnicking in the countryside, to hot air ballooning, contemporary literature, opera, and theatre. It has also been used by those seeking to subvert the establishment, as reflected by American revolutionary and other republican designs. New generations of designers continued this tradition, from Ireland’s Sybil Connolly to New Yorker Sheila Bridges, whose Harlem Toile is pictured above. Our chairman, John Gibson, will explore the Irish origins and continuing relevance of this most unlikely of contested grounds.

  • Wednesday the 7th of October, The Royal Irish Academy, 19 Dawson St.
  • Doors open at 6.30 pm and the lecture begins at 7 pm sharp.
  • Please R.S.V.P. to dubdecandfine@gmail.com

New Publication: Enlightening Enthusiasm by Lionel Laborie

laborieIn the summer 1706, three Protestant refugees from the last French war of religion arrived in London to prophesy the fall of Rome and Christ’s imminent Second Coming. They claimed to be inspired by the Holy Spirit, experienced bodily agitations and sought to revive the apostolic Church. Within two years, these ‘French Prophets’ counted nearly 500 followers, including Huguenots, Anglicans, Philadelphians, Quakers, Presbyterians, Baptists, Quietists and even Jews. Their movement launched missionary tribes after failing to resurrect one of their members from the dead and spread across Europe. They remained active in Britain until the late 1740s, reappearing sporadically among the first Methodists, Moravians and Shakers.

The French Prophets sparked one of the greatest controversies in eighteenth-century England, marked by a prodigious battle of pamphlets on revealed religion and miracles, violent riots and a political trial. They were branded as ‘enthusiasts’, then a derogatory label for religious fanaticism, but one whose modern representation largely draws upon the hostile discourse of Augustan moralists.

In his new book, Enlightening Enthusiasm: Prophecy and Religious Experience in Early Eighteenth-Century England (Manchester University Press, 2015), Lionel Laborie examines the nature of religious enthusiasm against the backdrop of the early English Enlightenment. It offers the first comprehensive approach to enthusiasm by looking at this multifarious issue from a social, religious, cultural, political and medical perspective. Based on new archival research, it challenges our modern understanding of this originally infamous term by dissociating religious experience from millenarianism, radical dissent and popular religion, to shed new light on the reality of enthusiasm in early Enlightenment England.

The book can be ordered from Manchester University Press. Follow this link for further information.

New Approaches to Ossian Symposium

The first collected edition of James Macpherson’s Ossian poems, The Works of Ossian was published in two volumes in 1765. To mark the 250th anniversary of this significant cultural event and the development of a new online resource, Ossian Online, a one-day symposium and public lecture will be held in the Royal Irish Academy, 19 Dawson street, Dublin on Friday 4 September 2015.

Reflecting the diversity of Ossian’s appeal, the symposium will feature speakers from a range of disciplines, presenting papers on new and recent research on Macpherson’s work. These talks will present new perspectives on familiar topics such as the role and meaning of Ireland in Ossian and Gaelic sources for the poetry, alongside considerations of the current status of Ossian studies in the academy and its potential place in public humanities. Digital humanities projects that focus on Ossian are represented by presentations on Ossian Online and on network analysis of the Ossian corpus. The symposium concludes with a public lecture by James Mulholland (North Carolina State University) on “Ossian and the Global Crisis in Authenticity”.

Attendance is free, but delegates are asked to register for the symposium on the Eventbrite website where you can also access the full programme.

This symposium is supported by the Irish Research Council’s New Foundations Scheme. Ossian Online is supported by the Moore Institute; School of Humanities, National University of Ireland, Galway; and the National Library of Scotland.

Literary Landscape of Ireland Storymap

Literary landscape

Michelle from Ard na Sidhe Country House, in Co. Kerry has put together an interactive StoryMap called ‘A Literary Landscape of Ireland’ to celebrate all of Ireland’s most prolific writers and poets.

This StoryMap highlights many of the places that inspired the writers and poets involved, as well as the locations where the writers grew up and attended school.

The entry on Jonathan Swift might be of particular interest to ECIS blog readers.

Follow this link to view the Literary Landscape of Ireland StoryMap in a new window.

CFP: Irish Panels at the 2016 ASECS Conference

The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies will hold its annual meeting in Pittsburgh, PA on 31 March to 3 April 2016.

The Irish Caucus is given two panels at the annual ASECS meeting.  Please see the descriptions of these panels below and consider proposing a paper for one of them.  Graduate students and junior scholars are especially encouraged to submit proposals. Abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) can be sent to Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu by 15 September 2015.

Panel 1: The Irish Enlightenment VIII

Over the past decade, scholars of the Enlightenment have increasingly recognized the contributions of Ireland to broader strands of eighteenth-century thought and the place of Irish thinkers’ work within the context of European and Atlantic intellectual movements.  This research has spawned an increasing number of essays, books, and conference panels, illustrating the vitality of debate concerning the Irish dimension of the Enlightenment and collectively helping to define the nature of the Irish Enlightenment.  This panel welcomes participants whose work focuses on Irish thought and/or its relationship to the Enlightenment world, especially papers that utilize new methodological approaches to the study of intellectual history; including (but not limited to) models drawn from the digital humanities, global history, and/or gender studies.

Panel 2: Conflict and Violence in Eighteenth-Century Ireland

During the long eighteenth-century, warfare and violence was inscribed upon Ireland.  The century began in the wake of the Battle of the Boyne and ended with the aftermath of the Rebellion of 1798.  Between these irruptions of conflict, Irish life was transformed by a series of internal rebellions and international wars.  This panel welcomes papers that explore how these destructive forces shaped the lives of people in Ireland during this period (politically, religiously, economically, socially) and/or how they were represented in popular culture (theatre, literature, history).

Follow this link to visit the ASECS website for further information.

Resources: Journal•Lists

journal lists

Journal•Lists is a free subscription service that emails you historical novels, periodicals and diaries in short e-installments.

It has been designed to recapture the process of reading in installments that was a key part of the reading experience in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It also offers a new way of reading diaries and letters that encourages a closer connection with their authors’ daily lives.

The first Journal•Lists goes live on 14 August with James Boswell’s Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides. If you sign up, you will receive each entry of Boswell’s diary on the anniversary of the day it was written.

Upcoming Journal•Lists will include The Spectator and Lord Byron’s Ravenna.

Go to www.journallists.wordpress.com to find out more.