Book Launch: James Kelly’s Food Rioting in Ireland

The launch of Prof. James Kelly’s new book Food Rioting in Ireland in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: The ‘Moral Economy’ and the Irish Crowd will take place in the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street, Dublin 2 from 6.00 pm to 8.00 pm on Thursday 30 November 2017.

Food rioting, one of the most studied manifestations of purposeful protest internationally, was practised in Ireland for a century and a half between the early eighteenth century and 1860. This book provides a fully documented account of this phenomenon, and seeks to lay the foundations for a more structured analysis of popular protest during a period when riotous behaviour was normative. Though the study challenges E.P. Thompson’s influential contention that there was no ‘moral economy’ in Ireland because Ireland did not provide the populace with the ‘political space’ in which they could bring pressure to bear on the elite, its primary achievement is, by demonstrating the enduring character of food rioting, to move the crowd from the periphery to the centre. In the process, it offers a rereading of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Irish history, and of the public response to the Great Famine.

The book will be launched by Cormac Ó Gráda, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

RSVP (acceptance only) Four Courts Press | info@fourcourtspress.ie
If you are unable to attend the launch but would still like to purchase a copy
of this book, please contact Four Courts Press directly at 01 453 4668.

To learn more about this book, visit the Four Courts Press website at
http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2017/food-rioting-in-ireland/

CFP: 32nd Irish Conference of Historians, UCC, April 2018

The 32nd Irish Conference of Historians will take place at University College Cork on 26-28 April 2018.

Proposals for papers/panels that address topics relating to the history of sex, sexuality and reproduction, in Ireland and across the world, from antiquity to the 1990s, are now invited. The conference is open to new researchers and established scholars.

For further information, please visit the website of the Irish Committee of Historical Sciences.

 

CFP: Silence in eighteenth-century arts, history and philosophy

The International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ISECS) is pleased to announce the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars.

Formerly called the East-West Seminar, the International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars brings together young researchers from a number of countries each year. The 2018 meeting will take place in Viterbo, Italy and will be organized by Prof.Francesca Saggini and the Dipartimento di studi linguistico-letterari, storico-filosofici e giuridici – DISTU.

Proposals for papers on the subject of the forms, representations and modalities of silence in the eighteenth century, are now invited for presentation at the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars. Colleagues from all fields of eighteenth-century studies are invited to submit abstracts for this one-week event.

For further details, follow this link to download the call for papers.

CFP: Special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019)

Papers are now invited for publication in a special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019), guest edited by Elizabeth Neiman and Tina Morin.

500 word abstracts due by 31 October 2017; first full drafts of 6,000-9,000 words due by May 2018. Please email submissions to Elizabeth Neiman (Elizabeth.Neiman@maine.edu) AND Tina Morin (Christina.Morin@ul.ie).

Follow this link to download the full CFP.

Events: Collective action, popular politics and policing 1700-1850

A symposium entitled ‘Collective action, popular politics and policing in Ireland and Great Britain, 1700-1850’ will take place at the Humanities Institute, University College Dublin on Friday, 1 September 2017.

The event is being chaired by David Hayton and Ivar McGrath and speakers will include Ewen Cameron, Iain Channing, James Kelly, Richard McMahon, Ruth Paley, Martyn Powell, and Timothy Watt.

For further information download the programme here, or contact the organiser, Timothy Watt, at timothy.watt@ucd.ie.

Registration for ECIS Annual Conference closing 4 June

Online registration for the 2017 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference will close at 5pm on Sunday, 4 June 2017.

The conference will take place in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin on 8-9 June 2017.

It is being held this year alongside the major international conference, Swift350, which is taking place to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift across two venues: Trinity College Dublin and Marsh’s Library.

Delegates registered for the ECIS conference may attend all of the Swift350 sessions.

To register now, please visit our Annual Conference page.

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Kristina Decker

Kristina Decker is a PhD student at University College Cork. Her research looks at Mary Delany and the female experience in eighteenth-century Ireland and she will be speaking about her work at the ECIS Annual Conference on 8-9 June 2017. You can find out more about Kristina by following her on twitter.

Favourite archive:
My favourite archive would have to be the British Library. I spent a lot of time there while I was completing a MA in Eighteenth Century Studies at King’s College London. It is a fantastic place to work and the sheer expanse of their collection is amazing. Whenever I’m in London I always plan a visit.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
It’s so hard to choose! I’ve spent so many hours wandering through the British Museum. I love the Enlightenment Gallery – they even have some of Mary Delany’s original ‘paper mosaiks’ on display there! But another favourite would be the John Soane museum. I first visited it when I was a young teenager and his rather eccentric house and collection really captivated my imagination!

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
These questions are so hard! Even though my current research focuses on Ireland, I would have to say London throughout the eighteenth-century – it was buzzing! I’d give anything to walk down the Strand during the eighteenth century.

Best online resource:
It would have to be ECCO. It’s an incredible resource. I can spend hours on there – I have to be careful not to get lost in it!

Best book of 18th century interest:
It’s a tie. I first encountered Amanda Vickery’s The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England and Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England during my master’s degree and they massively influenced the direction of my own research.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
I have to say Mary Delany! Is it possible to have a drink with her at different times of her life? I want to meet the young vivacious widow Mary Pendarves, the Mary Delany of Delville, and Mrs Delany the widowed artist. After reading her letters, I feel like I know her already. I hope that I’d measure up to her ideas of decorum and propriety and wouldn’t feature as a negative postscript in one of her letters!

What’s so great about the eighteenth century?
I don’t know where to begin! The eighteenth century was so vibrant! There’s the amazing architecture and literature. There’s the enlightenment, the birth of the novel as a literary genre, the industrial revolution, the American and French Revolutions… there was so much going on! What’s not great!? Ok… apart from poverty and disease.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?
I am currently in the first year of my PhD at University College Cork. My research focuses on Mary Delany’s letters from the period that she spent in Ireland. I am particularly interested in elements relating to decorum, propriety, the home (especially gendered space), and sociability.

The paper that I will be presenting at the 2017 ECIS focuses on Mary Delany’s first trip to Ireland in 1731. Mary Delany (then Mary Pendarves) liked Ireland so much that she extended her visit from six months to eighteen months. In her letters, Mary Pendarves describes Ireland with a fresh and very detailed eye. Using these letters as a window into her experience, my paper investigates Mary’s first encounters with Ireland. Her first impressions of the country, which, apart from the odd bad dancer, were generally very positive! My paper will discuss her experience of Ireland as a female member of the elite and how she perceived Ascendancy Ireland – as a place she could easily negotiate.

 

CFP: ‘Swift Today’ conference in Sofia University

A conference entitled ‘Swift Today: His Legacy from the Enlightenment to Modern-Day Politics’ will take place in Sofia University on 30 November – 1 December 2017.

The conference will be conducted in English. Abstracts of proposed papers (300 words) are now invited and can be submitted to the organisers at swifttodaysofia@gmail.com by 1 August 2017.

For further details, follow this link to download the full CFP.

 

CFP: Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies is pleased to announce that the sixteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar, Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment, will be held in Brisbane, Australia, at Griffith University and the University of Queensland on the 13th to 15th December 2017.

The following keynote speakers will be presenting at the conference:

  • Deidre Lynch (Harvard University)
  • Jan Golinski (University of New Hampshire)
  • Georgia Cowart (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Sujit Sivasundaram (University of Cambridge)

The Call for Papers is available to view on the ANZSECS website at the following link:

https://anzsecs.com/conference/natures-and-spaces-of-enlightenmentcall-for-papers/

Proposals on any aspect of the long eighteenth century related to the conference theme are welcome.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st August.

If you have any questions about the conference, please contact one of the organisers:

Peter Denney (p.denney@griffith.edu.au) or Lisa O’Connell (l.oconnell@uq.edu.au).

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Yuhki Takebayashi

Yuhki Takebayashi is a PhD student at Trinity College Dublin. His research looks at historical compilations of Oliver Goldsmith and he will be speaking about his work at the ECIS Annual Conference on 8-9 June 2017

Favourite archive:
It is always a pleasure to visit and study materials in the British Library.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
I recently visited the Georgian House Museum in Bristol, which was a wonderful place to exercise one’s imagination and consider what life may have been like in the eighteenth century for an affluent merchant.

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I would love to have joined the company of hack writers dining with Tobias Smollett.

Best online resource:
ECCO: The range of English language materials available, and the usability of the interface is outstanding.

Best book of 18th century interest:
James Prior’s study on the life of Oliver Goldsmith has been an important source in deepening my interest in Goldsmith.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Without a doubt, Oliver Goldsmith. Easy going, good natured, and ready to entertain, it is difficult to imagine how one could be displeased with his company.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference?

My research is concerned with the re-assessment and utilisation of the historical compilations of Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774). In contrast to his canonical texts, these works have fallen into a state of neglect. By fitting them into the context of eighteenth-century history writing, I am re-examining them as valuable sources that may provide an additional layer to the conceptualisation of the author and his literary endeavours.

My paper for the 2017 ECIS conference will engage with the issue of Goldsmith’s Irishness, which has been the subject of continuing scholarly interest. Specifically, I will be doing so by examining his English histories. To this extent, contemporary Irish historians and antiquarians, including Charles O’Conor, Sylvester O’Halloran, and John Curry, will be surveyed to provide a point of reference. It will be shown that Goldsmith’s histories reveal disparate thoughts and attitudes toward Ireland and the Irish that were left in interpretive abeyance. I will propose that occupying such an ambivalent position was necessary to Goldsmith’s particular situation as an Irish writer in London.

ECIS Annual Conference 2017

The 2017 ECIS Annual Conference will take place in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin on 8-9 June 2017.

It is being held this year alongside the major international conference, Swift350, which is taking place to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift across two venues: Trinity College Dublin and Marsh’s Library.

Four plenaries will be delivered across the two conferences by Prof. Moyra Haslett (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Mary-Ann Constantine (University of Wales), Prof. James Woolley (Lafayette College) and Prof. Ian McBride (University of Oxford).

Delegates registered for the ECIS conference may attend all of the Swift350 sessions.

To view the full programme or to register online, please visit our Annual Conference page.

Please note that online registration will close on 4 June.

Exhibition and public talk on eighteenth-century women’s writing

Armagh Public Library is currently hosting an exhibition of eighteenth-century women’s writing, featuring a number of the printed books held in the library’s collection. The exhibition runs until the end of March.

In association with the exhibition, the Armagh Public Library is also hosting the following public talk to celebrate International Women’s Day:

  • ‘”The Age of Female Authors”: eighteenth-century women’s writing in the Armagh Public Library’
  • Professor Moyra Haslett (Queen’s University Belfast)
  • 7.30pm, Wednesday 8th March
  • Armagh Public Library

All are welcome!

CFP: Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference

The 2017 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference will take place at the Royal Irish Academy and Trinity College Dublin on 7-9 June 2017, running in parallel with Swift350.

Proposals are now invited for twenty-minute papers (in English or Irish) on any aspect of eighteenth-century Ireland, including its history, literature, language, and culture.

Proposals from postgraduate students are particularly welcome and there are a limited number of bursaries available for attendance.

For further information, please visit our Annual Conference page.

CFP: Women, Money and Markets (1750-1850)

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In 2017, Jane Austen will feature on the £10 note as the sole female representative on British currency.  To mark this occasion, and explore its problematic significance, the English department at King’s College London is running a one-day conference on 11 May 2017 entitled ‘Women, Money and Markets (1750-1850)’.

The aim of the conference is to consider debates about women in relation to ideas of value, market, marketability, as well as debates about different forms of currency and exchange amongst women, and the place of the female writer in the literary marketplace past and presentThe conference will address themes including consumerism, shopping, global trade, domestic trade, markets (literary and otherwise), currency, and varying practices of exchange. The conference is interdisciplinary in nature, bridging literature, material culture, gender studies and economic history, and aims to relate the debates of the period to modern day issues about the presence and position of women in the economy and media.

Keynote speakers will include Professor Hannah Barker (University of Manchester), and Caroline Criado-Perez, OBE, one of the leading voices in the campaign for female representation on the banknote and an active promoter and supporter of women in the media.

Submissions are now invited, in the form of individual papers, panels and roundtable discussions, on the following themes:

  • The varying practices of women associated with currency, global and/or domestic markets and marketability
  • Material practices associated with value, exchange and/or female creativity
  • Women as producers and/or consumers in the literary or other marketplaces (including, but not limited to, food, clothing, agriculture and raw materials)
  • Representations of women at work or women’s involvement in:
  • Trade and industry
  • Professional services (such as law, finance, hospitality and the media)
  • Domestic service
  • The rural economy
  • The place of women in the literary marketplace (past and present)

We particularly welcome cross-cultural considerations of the above issues.

Please send 300 word abstracts to the conference email address (womenmoneymarkets@gmail.com) with an indication of your proposed format (individual paper, panel, roundtable, etc.).  If you are submitting a proposal for a panel, please include an abstract for each paper (up to 300 words each). Please indicate if you would like your paper to be considered for the edited volume that will be published after the conference.

Deadline for submissions: January 31st 2017

Conference Organisers: Dr Emma Newport (University of Sussex) and Amy Murat (King’s College London)

For enquiries regarding the programme, please contact: e.newport@sussex.ac.uk
For all general enquiries, please contact: womenmoneymarkets@gmail.com

Follow this link to download the call for papers.

New Book: Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period

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Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period edited by Jane Fenlon, Ruth Kenny, Caroline Pegum, and Brendan Rooney presents the finest contemporary research on Irish fine art from the 17th and 18th centuries. The contributors, both established and emergent Irish art historians, approach the production and reception of fine art in this period with substantial new work on a wide range of fascinating themes.

Table of Contents:

  1. ‘Parliament as Theatre: Francis Wheatley’s The Irish House of Commons Revisited’, Fintan Cullen.
  2. ‘Theft, Concealment and Exposure: Nathaniel Hone’s The Spartan Boy’, William Laffan.
  3. ‘Commerce, Conquest and Change: Thomas Hickey’s John Mowbray, Calcutta Merchant,attended by a Banian and a Messenger’, Siobhan McDermott.
  4. ‘Artistic connections between Dublin and London in the early-Georgian period: James Latham and Joseph Highmore’, Jacqueline Riding.
  5. ‘The “Strange and Unaccountable” John Van Nost: The Making of a Sculptural Career in Eighteenth-Century Ireland’, M.G. Sullivan.
  6. ‘An Irish Teniers? The Development of Paintings of Everyday Life in Ireland,c.1780–c.1810’, Mary Jane Boland.
  7. ‘The Portrait Collection in the Great Hall of the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin’, Jane Fenlon.
  8. ‘The Contribution of Foreign Artists to Cultural Life in Eighteenth-Century Dublin’, Nicola Figgis.
  9. ‘Visualising the Privileged Status of Motherhood: The Commemoration of Women in Irish Funerary Monuments, c.1600-c.1650’, Elaine Hoysted.

For further information, follow this link to visit the Irish Academic Press website.

 

Events: Newbridge House Study Day, 8 Nov. 2016.

Newbridge House by Janet Finlay Cobbe, née Grahame (1826-1884), c.1860, watercolour on paper, Cobbe collection no.205
Newbridge House by Janet Finlay Cobbe, née Grahame (1826-1884), c.1860, watercolour on paper, Cobbe collection no.205

The Irish Georgian Society and Fingal County Council, in collaboration with the Cobbe family, are partnering to deliver a study day which will examine the history and conservation of Newbridge’s architecture, designed landscape, decorative interiors and collection.

Speakers will include: Alec Cobbe, Cathal Dowd Smith, Dr Arthur MacGregor, Dr Anthony Malcomson, Fionnuala May, Una Ni Mhearain, Professor Finola O’ Kane Crimmins, David Skinner, Dr Adriaan Waiboer and Professor David Watkin.

Attendance fee is €90 to include lunch.  Bookings can be made through the Irish Georgian Society, 58 South William Street, Dublin 2.

T: 01 6798675.
E: info@igs.ie W:http://www.igs.ie/uploads/Final_Newbridge_Programme_for_web_HR.pdf

CFP Reminder: The Irish and the London Stage

Please note the Call for Papers for the conference on ‘The Irish and the London Stage: Identity, Culture, and Politics, 1680-1830’ to be held at Trinity College Dublin, 17-18 February 2017 is closing on 30 September.

Keynote speakers: Professor Helen Burke (Florida State) and Professor Felicity Nussbaum (UCLA)

Further details here: https://londonirishtheatreblog.wordpress.com/

CFP: Papers for the 2017 ASECS conference

The 2017 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference will be held in Minneapolis (MN), from March 30 – April 2; for more information, please see https://asecs.press.jhu.edu/general%20site/Final%202017%20Call%20for%20Papers%20edited.pdf.

The Irish Caucus will be organizing two panels at the annual ASECS meeting and an additional panel jointly with the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society.  Please see the descriptions of these panels below and consider proposing a paper for one of them.  Graduate students and junior scholars are especially encouraged to submit proposals.

 

Irish Caucus Panel 1: “The Irish Enlightenment IX”

(Irish Caucus; Scott Breuninger; University of South Dakota; Email: Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu)

Over the past decade, scholars of the Enlightenment have increasingly recognized the contributions of Ireland to broader strands of eighteenth-century thought and the place of Irish thinkers’ work within the context of European and Atlantic intellectual movements.  This research has spawned an increasing number of essays, books, and conference panels, illustrating the vitality of debate concerning the Irish dimension of the Enlightenment and collectively helping to define the nature of the Irish Enlightenment.  This panel welcomes participants whose work focuses on Irish thought and/or its relationship to the Enlightenment world, especially papers that utilize new methodological approaches to the study of intellectual history; including (but not limited to) models drawn from the digital humanities, global history, and/or gender studies.  If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Scott Breuninger (Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu) by September 15, 2016.

 

Irish Caucus Panel 2: “Aesthetics and Politics in Eighteenth-Century Ireland”

(Irish Caucus; Scott Breuninger; University of South Dakota; Email: Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu)

During the eighteenth century, questions of aesthetics in Ireland were often linked to notions of political or social authority.  Working in a society divided by religion, gender, and race, Irish artists were faced with the uncomfortably stark nature of political power and the (mis-)attribution of meaning(s) to their work.  In this context, many of the themes explored by Irish poets, playwrights, and musicians (among others) were necessarily grounded in discourses that tried to walk a fine line between personal expression and social expectations.  Some of these creative works explicitly drew from Ireland’s past to inform their meaning, others looked toward the future with varying degrees of optimism and pessimism.  In this nexus of aesthetic creativity, artists were forced to negotiate with a wide range of pressures that were unique to Hibernia.

 

This panel welcomes proposals that address how issues of artistic representation related to questions of political and social power within eighteenth-century Ireland.  Of particular interest are proposals that investigate how politically disenfranchised groups in Ireland addressed the connection between artistic representation, political power, and/or historical memory along lines associated with religion, gender, and race  If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Scott Breuninger (Scott.Breuninger@usd.edu) by September 15, 2016.

 

Joint Irish Studies/Scottish Studies Panel: “New Directions in Irish and Scottish Studies”
(Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society and Irish Studies Caucus) Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University; E-mail: leith@sfu.ca

The nations which we now know as Ireland and Scotland have a long history of connection and conflict dating back to prehistoric times when, as Tom Devine puts it, the two formed a “single cultural, religious, linguistic and economic zone” (3). It was only in the late 1990’s, however, in the context of the growing political strength of the Scottish devolution movement and the gains of the peace process in Northern Ireland, that academics working in Irish Studies and Scottish Studies began to look at connections between their fields of inquiry. Putting Irish Studies and Scottish Studies in dialogue with one another has had important implications, although it has also revealed some limitations. This panel invites scholars to reflect on the scholarly dialogue between Irish and Scottish studies either in the past or present. Submissions may consider new theoretical perspectives and/or examine specific textual or historical examples of connections between Ireland and Scotland. If interested, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to Leith Davis (leith@sfu.ca) by September 15, 2016.

 

Additional Irish-Themed Panel for ASECS

“The Ulster Scots in Ireland and North America”

David Clare, National University of Ireland, Galway

Email: DClare1@eircom.net

The Ulster Scots are an ethnic group descended from the Scottish people who settled in the North of Ireland during the reign of King James I. Today, they play an important role in Northern Irish political life and possess a vibrant, unique culture which is currently experiencing a revival. In the eighteenth century, the Ulster Scots emigrated in great numbers to North America, and, in the United States (where they became known as the “Scotch-Irish”), they contributed greatly to the development of American music, handicrafts, and political values. Despite their considerable impact on Irish and North American life, the Ulster Scots remain an under-regarded Irish subculture. For example, the excellent, eighteenth-century Rhyming Weaver poets are routinely omitted from “definitive” anthologies of Irish literature. Likewise, the Ulster Scots role in the 1798 Rebellion and their post-Rebellion transition to diehard British loyalty warrants further study. And there are still gaps in our understanding of the deep imprint that the Ulster Scots made on American politics and culture in the decades following their arrival. As such, this panel solicits papers which explore the impact of the Ulster Scots on Irish and/or North American political and cultural life in the long eighteenth-century.

If interested in this panel, please send an abstract of your paper (approximately 300 words) to David Clare (DClare1@eircom.net) by 15 September 2016.

 

 

Lord Charlemont’s Mysterious Tunnels at Marino

1280px-Casino_marino

Heritage Week, now in progress, opens various little-known attractions to the public. These include a series of mysterious tunnels built by Francis Caulfeild, 1st Earl of Charlemont (1728-1799) underneath the lands in the vicinity of the Casino at Marino in Dublin. The Marino tunnels, used by the IRA for firing practice during the War of Independence, may be visited at set times (http://casinomarino.ie).

Marino House is gone and most of the parklands built over, but the exquisite neoclassical Casino and the secret tunnels remain. The Irish Times of 19 August 2016 posited a suggestion as to why Lord Charlemont had the tunnels constructed: ‘His personal physician, Dr Charles Lucas, had also written a treatise on the health-giving benefits of water, so he was probably following instructions when he built the tunnels’.

It is true that Lucas was a great believer in the medical benefits of water and bathing and wrote a three-part treatise entitled An Essay on Waters (London 1756). However, an emphasis on subterranean bathing is not evident in Lucas’s voluminous publications. Perhaps the classically-influenced Charlemont, who had visited Rome in his youth, was endeavouring to replicate the famous underground of that city, where baths, temples and other built-over constructs have survived.

Charlemont was also a prominent member of the Society of Dilettanti, whose founder, Sir Francis Dashwood, of Hellfire Club notoriety, had a series of underground caves excavated between 1748 and 1752 near High Wycombe in England (http://goo.gl/szE1AV). It is not suggested that the more sober Charlemont indulged in the subterranean devil worship and orgies with which Dashwood’s name is associated. Yet the two men clearly shared a penchant for expensive tunnel construction, the reasons for which which are not entirely clear.

This post was written by Sean Murphy who would be delighted to hear from anyone who may have ideas about the possible reasons that Charlemont had the tunnels constructed. His email address is sjbmurphy (at) eircom.net or just add a comment below.

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Alvin Chen

 

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Alvin Chen is a D.Phil candidate in History at Christ Church, University of Oxford. He is interested in Eighteenth-Century European intellectual history, Enlightenment intellectual history and historiography. He will be speaking about his research in this area at the ECIS Annual Conference on 10-11 June 2016

Favourite archive:
Bodleian Library, British Library, and the National Library of Scotland

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and National Palace Museum in Taipei

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I would say Strand, London, in the 1760s.

Best online resource:
ECCO and EEBO

Best book of 18th century interest:
Blair Worden’s Roundhead Reputation and J.G.A. Pocock’s Barbarism and Religion, especially volumes III, IV, and V

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
I haven’t really thought about this. William Strahan might be a good drinking partner. It would be interesting to learn more details about eighteenth-century publishing industry.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2016?
My D.Phil thesis is on George Berkeley’s criticism of free-thinkers’ idea of an ‘enlightened age’. At the moment I am looking at Berkeley’s responses to free-thinkers’ mathematisation of natural philosophy, and their visions of human progress in terms of moral philosophy and political economy. My paper at the Annual Conference will be about Berkeley’s reflection on the problem of social stability, and the way in which this may enrich the present discussion of the theme by historians of Enlightenment political thought.

CFP: The Irish and the London Stage

cropped-a-player-in-london-dublin_1786

Proposals for papers are now being invited for a conference entitled ‘The Irish and the London Stage: Identity, Culture, and Politics, 1680-1830’ which will take place in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin on 17-18 February 2017.

The conference will consider the varied Irish contribution to the development of London’s theatrical world over the course of the eighteenth century.  This event is generously supported by the Marie-Curie programme.

Please visit the conference website for further information.

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Ciaran McDonough

ciaranmcdonagh

Ciaran McDonough is a doctoral research scholar at NUI Galway. Her research looks at nineteenth-century Irish antiquarianism and she will be speaking about her work at the ECIS Annual Conference on 10-11 June 2016. You can find out more about Ciaran’s research by visiting her academia.edu page or by following her on twitter.

Favourite archive:
The Royal Irish Academy

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
Dublin in the 1780s and 1790s – such a hub of activity!

Best online resource:
Archive.org

Best book of 18th century interest:
Clare O’Halloran, Golden Ages and Barbarous Nations – a brilliant guide to eighteenth-century antiquarianism.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Charles Vallancey. Having spent the past few years researching this fascinating character (and laughing at his ideas), I would like to see the man behind the mad ideas!

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2016?
I work on nineteenth-century antiquarianism and will be discussing some of the problems I have faced in working on a definition of an ‘antiquarian’. My paper at the conference will focus on what the term meant in the eighteenth-century and what antiquarian research consisted of in this time period. I will also make reference to the discrepancies in usage between the terms ‘antiquarian’ and ‘scholar’. Did the use of these terms reflect the type of work carried out? When Charles O’Conor referred to Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh as an ‘antiquary’, did he mean that Mac Fhirbhisigh carried out different work than himself? O’Conor has subsequently been referred to as a ‘scholar’ – is this another difference? My paper will attempt to answer these questions.

Call For Papers: Jonathan Swift 350

A conference to mark the 350th anniversary of the birth of Jonathan Swift will be held from 7-9 June 2017 in Trinity College Dublin.

Proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of Jonathan Swift’s life and work are invited, with papers on Swift and Ireland particularly welcome. Suggestions for round tables (including names of participants) will also be considered. Please send titles and abstracts (200 words) to the conference organizers at:

Registration for 2016 ECIS Annual Conference Now Open!

The 2016 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society  / An Cumann Éire San Ochtú Céad Déag Annual Conference will be held in National University of Ireland Galway on 10 – 11 June 2016. 

Plenaries will be delivered by Prof. Michael Brown (Aberdeen), Prof. Norma Clark (Kingston), and Dr Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail (UCD).

Registration is now open. Go to http://www.ecis.ie/annual-conference/ for further details.

Conference: Women’s Networks in Eighteenth-Century London and Dublin

The Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, Queen’s University Belfast is hosting a conference entitled ‘Women’s Networks in Eighteenth-Century London and Dublin’ which will take place at the Music Building, University Square, Old McMordie Hall on Friday 27 May 2016.

Please follow this link to download the full programme.

Conference: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Image from Splendor Solis, BL

A one-day conference, ‘Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland’, will be held in honour of Anne Laurence on 4 June 2016 at the Institute of Historical Research, London.

Speakers will include: Prof. James Daybell, Dr Amy Erickson, Dr Gemma Allen, Prof. Mary O’Dowd, Dr Frances Nolan, Dr Rosalind Carr, Prof. Jane Humphries, Dr Judith Spicksley and Dr Amanda Capern.

Further details are available at http://www.open.ac.uk/blogs/history/

Events: Irish Protestant Playwrights Conference

purgatory

The Irish Protestant Playwrights Conference, will be held at the Moore Institute, NUI Galway on 1-3 June 2016.

The conference will feature papers on a number of dramatists from the long eighteenth-century, including George Farquhar, Charles Macklin, Arthur Murphy, Elizabeth Griffith, Oliver Goldsmith, various Sheridans (to be precise, Thomas, Jr., Frances, and Richard Brinsley), and Maria Edgeworth.

Keynote speakers will include Professor Seán Kennedy (St Mary’s University, Halifax) and Dr Emilie Pine (UCD).

Further details about this event can be found on the Irish Protestant Playwrights website.

Book Launch: Finnian Ó Cionnaith, Exercise of Authority

exercise of authority cover

The launch of Finnian Ó Cionnaith’s new book Exercise of authority: Surveyor Thomas Owen and the paving, cleansing and lighting of Georgian Dublin is taking place on Wednesday 10 Feb at the Mansion House, Dublin. The book considers the work of the Dublin Paving Board and the ways in which this organisation controlled and maintained the streets of Georgian Dublin. It is the second in a series of books sponsored but Dublin City council on the history of engineering in the city. The Lord Mayor and Dr. Kieran Feighan of Engineers Ireland will be speaking at the launch.

 

Theatre in the Regency Era Conference

regency poster
A conference entitled ‘Theatre in the Regency Era: Plays, Performance, Practice 1795-1843’ will take place in Downing College, University of Cambridge, on July 29-31, 2016. Early bird rates are available until 30 January 2016.

This conference will explore the Regency Era’s dance, music and drama from a wide range of historical and methodological perspectives. The keynote address will be given by Celina Fox (The Arts of Industry in the Age of Enlightenment), and historical gesture specialist Jed Wentz (Conservatorium van Amsterdam) will present a lecture-performance. In addition, the conference will open with an introduction by Iain Mackintosh (Architecture, Actor and Audience) at the remarkable Cambridge Festival Theatre (built in 1814), providing a rare opportunity for conference attendees to see an original surviving Regency three-level horseshoe auditorium.

For further details and to book the conference, please see: www.regencytheatre2016.com