Can you tell us about #18thC artisan homes?

So, we know our readers are experts on eighteenth-century pubs but can you tell us anything about ‘artisan living’?  Here’s a query we received from a Creative Writing MA student…

I’m writing a story about a man from Geneva who settled with other Swiss watchmakers outside Waterford in and around 1783-5. They Continue reading Can you tell us about #18thC artisan homes?

No. 5 Vicars’ Hill – Armagh’s Hidden Gem

I thought I’d add another pin to the ECIS Blog Map this week with a post I’ve been meaning to write since the ECIS Annual Conference in June…

vicars hill

Vicars’ Hill is the name of a row of Georgian houses facing St Patrick’s Cathedral (CoI) in Armagh. This terrace has also been known Continue reading No. 5 Vicars’ Hill – Armagh’s Hidden Gem

Irish Dances Never Before Printed

48 Irish Dances

Anyone interested in Irish music and dance might like to take a look at Forty eight original Irish dances… Book I & 2 (Dublin, 1795). You can download your own copy from the Bibliothèque nationale de France’s Gallica resource. The publisher and music seller, Morris Hime, sold the publication at his Continue reading Irish Dances Never Before Printed

Social Networking

Did you know that the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society has a Facebook page maintained by Clíona Ó Gallchoir?

Clíona writes…

If you have a Facebook account, and you haven’t already come across the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Facebook page, then make sure to visit and ‘Like’ the page, which currently has a small but select Continue reading Social Networking

William III’s Chair

William III's Chair

On Sunday, 6 July 1690 (o.s.), a thanksgiving was held in St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin to celebrate William III’s victory over James II at the Battle of the Boyne (which took place on 1 July 1690 (o.s.) or 12 July 1690 (n.s.), depending on what calendar you prefer).

If you go to Continue reading William III’s Chair

The Progress of an Irishman

Lewis Walpole 0

This etching by Richard Newton from 1794 shows the ‘Progress of an Irishman’ through his life in fifteen figures. The first figure shows the Irishman on the way to school (eating a potato for breakfast) and the rest of the pictures tell the story of other major events in his life, such Continue reading The Progress of an Irishman

Resources: William Penn’s links to Ireland

Penn portrait
William Penn (1666) from Wikimedia Commons

This is a picture of William Penn at the age of 22. Penn is well known as an early Quaker and founder of the colony of Pennsylvania, which is named after his father, Sir Admiral William Penn (1621-1670).

This summer, I am going Continue reading Resources: William Penn’s links to Ireland

Resources: Anne Devlin

A few weeks ago, I went on the Women’s History tour of Glasnevin Cemetery. As expected, much of the focus was on early twentieth century Irish politics, but there was one grave of eighteenth-century interest that caught my attention.

This is a picture of the grave of Anne Devlin, now remembered as Continue reading Resources: Anne Devlin

Member Profiles: Patrick Walsh

Dr Patrick WalshPatrick Walsh is Reviews Editor of Eighteenth-Century Ireland/Iris an dá chultúr and an Irish Research Council CARA Postdoctoral Research Fellow based at the School of History and Archives, UCD. His research looks at Irish economic, social and political history in the long eighteenth century. He is currently writing a book on Continue reading Member Profiles: Patrick Walsh

Resources Round-up May 2014

The blog has been up and running for just over a month now so I thought I’d gather together all of the useful resources, databases, blogs, heritage sites, libraries, archives and websites that have been mentioned so far. The list is pretty impressive already and we’ll keep building on it in Continue reading Resources Round-up May 2014

Member Profiles: Joe Lines

Joe Lines

Joe Lines is a PhD student at Queen’s University Belfast. His research looks at Irish fiction from 1660-1790. Joe is a member of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society and will be speaking at the 2014 Annual Conference in Armagh.  

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Shandy Hall, North Yorkshire

Most exciting place or time in Continue reading Member Profiles: Joe Lines

Ten Reasons to go to the 2014 ECIS Annual Conference

Moyra Haslett has been busy organising the 2014 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society Annual Conference which will take place on 6-8 June 2014 – that’s only two weeks away!  It’s going to be a great weekend and here are just a few of the highlights to tempt you to join us all in Continue reading Ten Reasons to go to the 2014 ECIS Annual Conference

Resources: A Modest Proposal

Modest Proposal 3
[From seattlesportsinsider.com]
First published in 1729, Jonathan Swift’s Modest Proposal is a well known satire highlighting Ireland’s economic difficulties at that time.

In the publication, Swift recommends a scheme that would prevent children from being ‘a charge upon their parents or the parish, or wanting food and raiment for Continue reading Resources: A Modest Proposal

Member Profiles: Heather McKendry

Heather McKendryHeather McKendry is a PhD candidate at McMaster University. Her research interests include Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, prostitute narratives, representations of epidemics and venereal disease, economic history and crime writing. Heather is a new member of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society and will be speaking at the 2014 Annual Conference in Armagh.  Continue reading Member Profiles: Heather McKendry

Resources: Extraordinary Calculous Concretions by Charles Lucas

Lucas, Kidney stones image

This image is a ‘sketch in pencil and grey wash of kidney stones extracted from a woman’. It was drawn in 1746 and sent by Charles Lucas, a Dublin apothecary, to Martin Folkes, President of the Royal Society.  If you would like to take a closer look, you can download a Continue reading Resources: Extraordinary Calculous Concretions by Charles Lucas

Resources: Rocque’s Survey of Dublin 1757

If you have a bit of time to spare today, you should check out John Rocque’s A Survey of the City, Harbour, Bay and Environs of Dublin (London, 1757) available to view and download on Gallica. For anyone not already familiar with Gallica, it is a resource that provides access to Continue reading Resources: Rocque’s Survey of Dublin 1757

New Books: Intellectual Journeys

Details below on a recent volume, Intellectual Journeys: The Translation of ideas in Enlightenment England, France and Ireland edited by Lise Andries, Frédéric Ogée, John Dunkley and Darach Sanfey. The papers included in the volume are drawn from three conferences on that theme organised respectively by the French, British and Irish Continue reading New Books: Intellectual Journeys

New Books: The Irish Poet and the Natural World

Prof. Andrew Carpenter writes:

The Irish Poet and the Natural World: an anthology of verse in English from the Tudors to the Romantics. Edited by Andrew Carpenter and Lucy Collins. Cork University Press.

This annotated anthology of poems makes available a rich variety of Irish texts depicting the relationship between humans and the Continue reading New Books: The Irish Poet and the Natural World

Member Profiles: Eoin Magennis

Eoin Magennis is President of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society and Economist and Policy Research Manager in InterTradeIreland, the cross-border trade and business development body. His research focuses on Ireland of the ‘short’ mid-eighteenth century, 1725-1785 and its politics, economy, improvement and protests. For further information see his webpage, https://independent.academia.edu/eoinmagennis.

Favourite archive:
The Armagh Continue reading Member Profiles: Eoin Magennis