CFP: Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley

Scholars in any academic discipline are invited to submit abstracts of papers to be presented at the Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley conference, to be held in Trinity College Dublin, 5 and 6 April 2019.

George Berkeley’s Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710) and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713) are standard texts in the philosophy curricula of most European and American universities. No other Irish philosopher, and no other work of Berkeley’s, has achieved this ‘canonical’ status. However, there was a vibrant philosophical scene in Ireland in Berkeley’s lifetime, to which Berkeley was far from the only contributor. Studying this broader Irish philosophical discussion will improve our understanding of Berkeley and also of early modern philosophy more generally.

The Irish Philosophy in the Age of Berkeley conference will include general exploration of the intellectual culture of early modern Ireland as well as examination of specific thinkers with significant connections to Ireland active during Berkeley’s lifetime (1685–1753). Such figures include Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh (1615–1691); Robert Boyle (1627–1691); Michael Moore (c. 1639–1726); William King (1650–1729); William Molyneux (1656–1698); Edward Synge (1659–1741); Jonathan Swift (1667–1745); John Toland (1670–1722); Peter Browne (d. 1735); and Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746).

Invited speakers will include:

• Lisa Downing, Professor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, USA
• Eric Schliesser, Professor of Political Science, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
• Kate Davison, Lecturer in Long Eighteenth-Century History, University of Sheffield, UK
Approximately nine additional papers will be selected by anonymous review of submitted abstracts.

We welcome abstracts from scholars in any discipline addressing one or more of the following issues:

• The Irish context of Berkeley’s philosophy.
• The philosophical work of other Irish thinkers active during Berkeley’s lifetime.
• The reception within Ireland of other philosophical figures, ideas, and movements.
• The reception of Irish philosophy outside Ireland.

Particular preference will be given to papers that address figures and/or topics outside the currently recognized philosophical ‘canon’, including the work of early modern women.
Papers presented at the conference will be published as part of the Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements series, Cambridge University Press.

Abstracts should be submitted by 15 October, 2018. Full details, including submission instructions, are available at: http://www.tcd.ie/Philosophy/events/IPAB/.

Participants and attendees may also be interested in attending Berkeleian Minds: Will and Understanding, to be held at the University of York on 2 and 3 April (https://philevents.org/event/show/63750).

Primary sponsorship for this conference is provided by the Royal Institute of Philosophy, together with the Mind Association. Additional support is provided by the Trinity Long Room Hub Making Ireland Research Theme and the Department of Philosophy, Trinity College Dublin.

Postgrad Bursary Winners: Anne-Claire Michoux

Anne-Claire Michoux is a doctoral assistant at the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. Her research focuses on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century fiction, women’s writing, and national identity. She will be speaking about her work at the ECIS Annual Conference on 8-9 June 2018

Favourite archive:
I would love to have the opportunity to do more archival research but I would have to say the Huntington Library so far. Their art gallery and gardens are wonderful.

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
The Musée d’Orsay. Kedleston Hall in Derbyshire is also worth a visit.

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
Any event which the Duchess of Devonshire attended. Otherwise, I would be really curious to know what it was really to go to theatre at the time.

Best online resource:
ECCO and the Adam Matthews Digital Archives

Best book of 18th century interest:
It’s really hard to pick one, there are so many, but I would say Deidre Shauna Lynch, The Economy of Character, and Patricia Meyer Spacks’ Privacy: Concealing the Eighteenth-Century Self

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Marie Antoinette and Mary Wollstonecraft

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2016?
My doctoral thesis examines the construction of British national identity in women’s fiction of the Romantic period, with a particular focus on Jane Austen, Frances Burney, and Maria Edgeworth, whose work has become increasingly prominent over the course of my research. The paper I will present at the conference offers a reading of Edgeworth’s last Irish novel, Ormond (1817), and its negotiation of national identity. Edgeworth’s protagonists often have complicated national allegiances and the eponymous Ormond is no exception: an English orphan, he is raised in Ireland by the Irish landlord Sir Ulick O’Shane, who served in the same regiment as his father. As he embarks on a career as an ‘Irish Tom Jones’, the young Ormond develops as a ‘gentleman’, an issue that many novels in the period also dramatized. It is this examination of the figure of the gentleman that is at the heart of the novel’s positioning of its hero as an Irish and British citizen. I will draw connections to Jane Austen’s Emma (1816) and William Shakespeare’s Henriad to demonstrate Edgeworth’s participation in the debates on the nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

A. C. Elias Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowships for 2018

The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) has awarded A.C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowships for 2018 to Kelly J. Hunnings, a Ph.D. Student at the University of New Mexico and Kevin Murphy, a Ph.D student at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Both scholars are writing dissertations that require research into primary eighteenth-century materials in Ireland. Ms. Hunnings’s will travel to Ireland during the summer of 2018 to work on a research project entitled “Ireland and the Laboring-Class Poetic Tradition: The Ecology of the Domestic in Mary Barber’s Verse.” Mr. Murphy’s research trip to Ireland will involve masonic records in Dublin and Cork and the Rebellion Papers at the National Library for a project entitled “Coercion and Sworn Bond in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic.”

The A. C. Elias, Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship, with $2500 in annual funding, supports “documentary scholarship on Ireland in the period between the Treaty of Limerick (1691) and the Act of Union (1800), by enabling North American-based scholars to travel to Ireland and Irish-based scholars to travel to North America”. Projects conducting original research on any aspect of eighteenth-century Ireland qualify for consideration, but recipients must be either (1) members of ASECS who have permanent residence in the United States or Canada, or (2) members of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society, residing in Ireland.

The closing date for the next A. C. Elias, Jr. Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship is 15 November 2018. Applications should be sent to the fellowship’s two trustees: Dr. Jason McElligott, The Keeper, Marsh’s Library, St. Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, Ireland (jason.mcelligott@marshlibrary.ie) and Dr. James May (jem4@psu.edu; 1423 Hillcrest Road, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 17603, USA).

Applications must consist of:
• The coversheet downloaded from the ASECS website: https://asecs.press.jhu.edu/general%20site/travelgr.html
• A short curriculum vitae (no more than 3 pages)
• A description of the project to be undertaken (no more than 3 pages, treating its contribution to the field and work to be done during the proposed research period)
• A one-page bibliography of related books and articles
• An indicative budget for the research trip
• Two signed letters of recommendation.

Further information is available from the trustees, Dr McElligott and Dr May, at the email addresses listed above.

CFP: Charles Macklin and the Making of Georgian Theatre

A conference entitled ‘Charles Macklin and the Making of Georgian Theatre’ will take place at the Notre Dame London Gateway, 1 Suffolk St, London on 22-23 June 2018.

Abstracts (max 500 words) for 3-5,000 word papers on Macklin’s life and career should be sent, with a short biography, to both Ian Newman (inewman@nd.edu) and David O’Shaughnessy (doshaug@tcd.ie) by 31 March 2018.

Download the CFP for further information.

Events: 2018 Irish Seminar

The Notre Dame Keough-Naughton Institute’s 2018 interdisciplinary IRISH Seminar will take place in Dublin & Kylemore on 11-29 June 2018. The theme of this year’s seminar is ‘Ireland 1600-1800: Kingdom, Colony, Union, Empire’.

For information on the schedule, application process, and fees, please visit international.nd.edu/irishseminar

Please note that the deadline for applications is 22 February.

Book Launch: James Kelly’s Food Rioting in Ireland

The launch of Prof. James Kelly’s new book Food Rioting in Ireland in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: The ‘Moral Economy’ and the Irish Crowd will take place in the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street, Dublin 2 from 6.00 pm to 8.00 pm on Thursday 30 November 2017.

Food rioting, one of the most studied manifestations of purposeful protest internationally, was practised in Ireland for a century and a half between the early eighteenth century and 1860. This book provides a fully documented account of this phenomenon, and seeks to lay the foundations for a more structured analysis of popular protest during a period when riotous behaviour was normative. Though the study challenges E.P. Thompson’s influential contention that there was no ‘moral economy’ in Ireland because Ireland did not provide the populace with the ‘political space’ in which they could bring pressure to bear on the elite, its primary achievement is, by demonstrating the enduring character of food rioting, to move the crowd from the periphery to the centre. In the process, it offers a rereading of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Irish history, and of the public response to the Great Famine.

The book will be launched by Cormac Ó Gráda, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

RSVP (acceptance only) Four Courts Press | info@fourcourtspress.ie
If you are unable to attend the launch but would still like to purchase a copy
of this book, please contact Four Courts Press directly at 01 453 4668.

To learn more about this book, visit the Four Courts Press website at
http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2017/food-rioting-in-ireland/

CFP: 32nd Irish Conference of Historians, UCC, April 2018

The 32nd Irish Conference of Historians will take place at University College Cork on 26-28 April 2018.

Proposals for papers/panels that address topics relating to the history of sex, sexuality and reproduction, in Ireland and across the world, from antiquity to the 1990s, are now invited. The conference is open to new researchers and established scholars.

For further information, please visit the website of the Irish Committee of Historical Sciences.

 

CFP: Silence in eighteenth-century arts, history and philosophy

The International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ISECS) is pleased to announce the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars.

Formerly called the East-West Seminar, the International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars brings together young researchers from a number of countries each year. The 2018 meeting will take place in Viterbo, Italy and will be organized by Prof.Francesca Saggini and the Dipartimento di studi linguistico-letterari, storico-filosofici e giuridici – DISTU.

Proposals for papers on the subject of the forms, representations and modalities of silence in the eighteenth century, are now invited for presentation at the 2018 International Seminar for Early Career Eighteenth-Century Scholars. Colleagues from all fields of eighteenth-century studies are invited to submit abstracts for this one-week event.

For further details, follow this link to download the call for papers.

CFP: Special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019)

Papers are now invited for publication in a special issue of Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840 (Spring 2019), guest edited by Elizabeth Neiman and Tina Morin.

500 word abstracts due by 31 October 2017; first full drafts of 6,000-9,000 words due by May 2018. Please email submissions to Elizabeth Neiman (Elizabeth.Neiman@maine.edu) AND Tina Morin (Christina.Morin@ul.ie).

Follow this link to download the full CFP.

CFP: Maria Edgeworth and Scottish Enlightenment Networks

Maria Edgeworth’s involvement with Scottish Enlightenment thinking has long been recognized, but much yet remains to be discovered about the extent, complexity and implications of her engagement with the ideas of Adam Smith, David Hume, William Hunter, Hugh Blair, Dugald Stewart and other philosophers, scientists and writers from that era. For a panel on “Maria Edgeworth and Scottish Enlightenment Networks” to be proposed for the 2018 conference of the ECSSS, papers are invited on any strands of Scottish Enlightenment thinking woven into Edgeworth’s works, life and reputation.

While papers might consider the place of Scottish Enlightenment concepts in Edgeworth’s writing, they might also consider Edgeworth’s place in conceptualizations of the Scottish, Irish or other Enlightenments and how association with Enlightenment has affected her reception—or should affect it in the future. Also welcome are papers that consider how Scottish Enlightenment networks enmesh the activities of Richard Lovell Edgeworth and the administration of Edgeworthstown.

Please send abstracts of 300 words, along with a one-page cv, by 10 October 2017 to Regina Hewitt (U of South Florida) reghew@hotmail.com or hwt87@earthlink.net

ECSSS (the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society) will meet at the University of Glasgow from 17 to 21 July 2018. The conference theme is “Networks of Enlightenment.” More information can be found at http://tinyurl.com/y9nyx5vq.

Please note that the deadline for abstracts for the proposed Edgeworth panel is earlier than the deadline in the main CFP for the conference in order to allow time for the panel to be composed by that final submission deadline and for extra abstracts to be forwarded to the organizers and considered for other sessions.

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Alvin Chen

 

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Alvin Chen is a D.Phil candidate in History at Christ Church, University of Oxford. He is interested in Eighteenth-Century European intellectual history, Enlightenment intellectual history and historiography. He will be speaking about his research in this area at the ECIS Annual Conference on 10-11 June 2016

Favourite archive:
Bodleian Library, British Library, and the National Library of Scotland

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and National Palace Museum in Taipei

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
I would say Strand, London, in the 1760s.

Best online resource:
ECCO and EEBO

Best book of 18th century interest:
Blair Worden’s Roundhead Reputation and J.G.A. Pocock’s Barbarism and Religion, especially volumes III, IV, and V

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
I haven’t really thought about this. William Strahan might be a good drinking partner. It would be interesting to learn more details about eighteenth-century publishing industry.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2016?
My D.Phil thesis is on George Berkeley’s criticism of free-thinkers’ idea of an ‘enlightened age’. At the moment I am looking at Berkeley’s responses to free-thinkers’ mathematisation of natural philosophy, and their visions of human progress in terms of moral philosophy and political economy. My paper at the Annual Conference will be about Berkeley’s reflection on the problem of social stability, and the way in which this may enrich the present discussion of the theme by historians of Enlightenment political thought.

Postgrad Bursary Winner Profiles: Ciaran McDonough

ciaranmcdonagh

Ciaran McDonough is a doctoral research scholar at NUI Galway. Her research looks at nineteenth-century Irish antiquarianism and she will be speaking about her work at the ECIS Annual Conference on 10-11 June 2016. You can find out more about Ciaran’s research by visiting her academia.edu page or by following her on twitter.

Favourite archive:
The Royal Irish Academy

Favourite museum, gallery or heritage site:
National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology

Most exciting place or time in the eighteenth-century:
Dublin in the 1780s and 1790s – such a hub of activity!

Best online resource:
Archive.org

Best book of 18th century interest:
Clare O’Halloran, Golden Ages and Barbarous Nations – a brilliant guide to eighteenth-century antiquarianism.

What eighteenth century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
Charles Vallancey. Having spent the past few years researching this fascinating character (and laughing at his ideas), I would like to see the man behind the mad ideas!

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2016?
I work on nineteenth-century antiquarianism and will be discussing some of the problems I have faced in working on a definition of an ‘antiquarian’. My paper at the conference will focus on what the term meant in the eighteenth-century and what antiquarian research consisted of in this time period. I will also make reference to the discrepancies in usage between the terms ‘antiquarian’ and ‘scholar’. Did the use of these terms reflect the type of work carried out? When Charles O’Conor referred to Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh as an ‘antiquary’, did he mean that Mac Fhirbhisigh carried out different work than himself? O’Conor has subsequently been referred to as a ‘scholar’ – is this another difference? My paper will attempt to answer these questions.

Member Profiles: Maeve O’Dwyer

Maeve O'Dwyer

Maeve O’Dwyer is a third year Art History PhD from the University of Edinburgh interested in all things C18- especially classicism, portraiture, sculpture, the Grand Tour and ideas of identity, especially Irishness. She will be speaking at the 2015 Annual Conference in Cork. Feel free to contact her ahead of the conference on Twitter @ODwyerMaeve.

What is your favourite museum, gallery or heritage site?
That’s a tough question. I’d have to say the Vatican Museum. They have one of my favourite sculptures, the Sleeping Ariadne, and there’s always a feeling that there’s more to see around the corner.

What is your favourite online resource?
The Internet Archive, for easy access to resources digitized and uploaded by other institutions.

What is your favourite book/poem/painting/object of 18th century interest?
I’d have to say the fabulous 1774 portrait of Thomas William Coke, by Pompeo Batoni. I’d love to get to Holkham Hall to see it in person.

What 18th century figure would you most like to have a drink with?
James Caulfield, Lord Charlemont. I’d ask him about his sense of identity, his portraits, and whether he was really mugged twice on his own land because he insisted it remain open to the public.

What will you be talking about at the ECIS Annual Conference 2015?
I’ll be discussing 1750s Rome, with a focus on the visual evidence of Irishmen abroad at a time when the Grand Tour itinerary was only just beginning to be set. I’ll consider how influential the Irish were in setting the standard for imagery of Grand Tourists for decades to come, and the possibility of reading a tension between Irishness and Britishness into their portraiture.

Francis Higgins ‘The Sham Squire’

The National Library of Ireland is working to make many of its resources available online. There is an impressive range of material already available through their online catalogue. I was browsing through some images recently and came across this print of Francis Higgins (1745?-1802).

Francis Higgins Belphegor or the Devil Continue reading Francis Higgins ‘The Sham Squire’

Best of the Net: Tuesday 28 October

Beer Street

Sunday was the 250th anniversary of the death of the painter and printmaker, William Hogarth. An article in the Economist’s Prospero blog reflected on Hogarth’s famous works, ‘Gin Lane’ and ‘Beer Street’ (1751) and an article in the Guardian’s art blog considered his impact on British art.

Ever wondered why papercuts hurt Continue reading Best of the Net: Tuesday 28 October

Member Profiles: Amy Prendergast

Amy Prendergast

Amy Prendergast is a committee member of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society and an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at Trinity College Dublin. Amy’s research interests include literary history and associational life, and she is currently working on her first monograph which will look at literary salons in France, Britain and Ireland.  Continue reading Member Profiles: Amy Prendergast

Member Profiles: Andrew Carpenter

Capture

Andrew Carpenter is a committee member of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society. He was the founding president of the society and founding editor of the society’s journal, Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr. He is Emeritus Professor of English at University College Dublin. His research interests include Irish poetry in English, 1660-1800, Continue reading Member Profiles: Andrew Carpenter

Best of the Net: Monday, 8 September

‘Romantic Circles’, a refereed scholarly website, has recently published a digital edition of Ann Flaxman, An Uninteresting Detail of a Journey to Rome, available here. It tells the story of a female Grand Tour which commenced in 1787.

If you’d like to know more about personal ads in eighteenth century newspapers, check Continue reading Best of the Net: Monday, 8 September

Member Profiles: Robert Mahony

Bob face June 13Robert Mahony has been a member of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society (intermittently) since 1986. He was Professor of English at the Catholic University of America and is now retired. His research focus is Jonathan Swift.

Favourite archive:
Mainly archives in Dublin or London, sometimes the Library of Congress and the Folger Library, Washington.

Favourite Continue reading Member Profiles: Robert Mahony

Can you tell us about #18thC artisan homes?

So, we know our readers are experts on eighteenth-century pubs but can you tell us anything about ‘artisan living’?  Here’s a query we received from a Creative Writing MA student…

I’m writing a story about a man from Geneva who settled with other Swiss watchmakers outside Waterford in and around 1783-5. They Continue reading Can you tell us about #18thC artisan homes?